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Predictors of receiving a diagnosis, referral and treatment of depression in people on antiretroviral therapy in South African primary care: a secondary analysis of data from a randomised trial

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

the CobALT Research Team

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1450-1466
Number of pages17
JournalTropical Medicine and International Health
Volume25
Issue number12
DOIs
Accepted/In press2020
PublishedDec 2020

King's Authors

Abstract

Objective: To describe the receipt of a diagnosis, referral and treatment for depression in people receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART), with depressive symptoms and attending primary care clinics in South Africa, and investigate factors associated with receiving these components of care. Methods: This is a secondary analysis of data from a randomised controlled trial of an intervention intended to improve detection and treatment of depression in primary care patients receiving ART. In this analysis, we combined cross-sectional and longitudinal data from the intervention and control arms. Using regression models and adjusting for intra-cluster correlation of outcomes, we investigated associations between socioeconomic characteristics, depressive symptoms, stress, disability and stigma, and receipt of a diagnosis, referral and treatment for depression. Results: Of 2002 participants enrolled, 18% reported a previous diagnosis of depression by a healthcare worker and 10% reported having received counselling from a specialist mental health worker. Diagnosis, referral and counselling during the follow-up period were appropriately targeted, being independently more frequent in participants with higher enrolment scores for depressive symptoms, stress or disability. Participants with higher stigma scores at enrolment were independently less likely to receive counselling. Severe socio-economic deprivation was common but was not associated with treatment. Conclusion: While the receipt of a diagnosis, referral and treatment for depression were uncommon, they seemed to be appropriately targeted. Socio-economic deprivation was not associated with treatment.

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