Prevalence of metabolic syndrome among the adult population in western China and the association with socioeconomic and individual factors: four cross-sectional studies

Xinyin Xu, Jing Zeng, Wei Yang, Ting Dong, Xin Zhang, Shuwen Cheng, Xiaobo Zhou, Maigeng Zhou, Ling Niu, Guanghui Yi, You Li, Lishi Zhang, Yin Deng*, Xianping Wu*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objectives This study explored the prevalence of and individual influencing factors for metabolic syndrome (MS) as well as associated socioeconomic factors and regional aggregation. Design Four cross-sectional surveys were analysed for trends in MS and associations with socioeconomic and individual factors through multilevel logistic regression analyses. The risk associated with nutrient intake was also assessed through a dietary survey in 2015. Setting From 2010 to 2018, 8-15 counties/districts of West China were included. Participants A total of 28 274 adults were included in the prevalence analysis. A total of 23 708 adults were used to analyse the related factors. Results The overall prevalence of MS ranged from 21.4% to 27.8% over the 8 years, remaining basically stable within the 95% CI. Our study found that the urbanisation rate and hospital beds per 1000 people were positively associated with MS, and the number of doctors in healthcare institutions per 1000 persons was negatively associated with MS. The ORs for females, people with college education and higher and unmarried or single people were 1.49, 0.67 and 0.51, respectively (p<0.05). The ORs of people who smoked at least 20 cigarettes/day, ate more than 100 g of red meat/day, consumed fruit or vegetable juice and drank carbonated soft drinks less than weekly were 1.10, 1.16, 1.19-1.27 and 0.81-0.84, respectively. The ORs rose with increasing sedentary time and decreased with higher physical activity. Conclusion The high burden of MS, unreasonable proportions of energy and micronutrient intake and low percentage of high levels of physical activity were the major challenges to public health in western China. Improving the human resources component of medical services, such as the number of doctors, increasing the availability of public sports facilities and E-health tools and improving individual dietary quality and education might help prevent MS.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere052457
JournalBMJ Open
Volume12
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Apr 2022

Keywords

  • diabetes & endocrinology
  • epidemiology
  • health policy
  • nutrition & dietetics
  • statistics & research methods

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