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Prospective associations of different contexts of physical activity with psychological distress and well-being among middle-aged adults: An analysis of the 1970 British Cohort Study

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Prospective associations of different contexts of physical activity with psychological distress and well-being among middle-aged adults : An analysis of the 1970 British Cohort Study. / Werneck, André O; Stubbs, Brendon; Kandola, Aaron; Hamer, Mark; Silva, Danilo R.

In: Journal of psychiatric research, Vol. 140, 08.2021, p. 15-21.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Harvard

Werneck, AO, Stubbs, B, Kandola, A, Hamer, M & Silva, DR 2021, 'Prospective associations of different contexts of physical activity with psychological distress and well-being among middle-aged adults: An analysis of the 1970 British Cohort Study', Journal of psychiatric research, vol. 140, pp. 15-21. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jpsychires.2021.05.049

APA

Werneck, A. O., Stubbs, B., Kandola, A., Hamer, M., & Silva, D. R. (2021). Prospective associations of different contexts of physical activity with psychological distress and well-being among middle-aged adults: An analysis of the 1970 British Cohort Study. Journal of psychiatric research, 140, 15-21. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jpsychires.2021.05.049

Vancouver

Werneck AO, Stubbs B, Kandola A, Hamer M, Silva DR. Prospective associations of different contexts of physical activity with psychological distress and well-being among middle-aged adults: An analysis of the 1970 British Cohort Study. Journal of psychiatric research. 2021 Aug;140:15-21. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jpsychires.2021.05.049

Author

Werneck, André O ; Stubbs, Brendon ; Kandola, Aaron ; Hamer, Mark ; Silva, Danilo R. / Prospective associations of different contexts of physical activity with psychological distress and well-being among middle-aged adults : An analysis of the 1970 British Cohort Study. In: Journal of psychiatric research. 2021 ; Vol. 140. pp. 15-21.

Bibtex Download

@article{43b6a630c4574f6f916cbcfa482ce05d,
title = "Prospective associations of different contexts of physical activity with psychological distress and well-being among middle-aged adults: An analysis of the 1970 British Cohort Study",
abstract = "Background: Our aim was to investigate whether different types and social contexts of physical activity (PA) participation are prospectively associated with psychological distress and well-being among middle-aged adults. Methods: Data from the 1970 British Cohort Study was used (N = 5144–2733 women). At age 42y, participants reported their type of leisure-time PA, which was classified as individual PA or group PA (exposure). At age 46y, participants reported co-primary outcomes: psychological distress (Malaise Inventory) and well-being (Warwick-Edinburgh scale). Highest academic achievement, employment status, country of interview, baseline values of psychological distress and well-being, smoking, alcohol use, TV-viewing and total physical activity at 42y were used as covariates. Main analyses included linear regression stratifying by sex. Results: Jogging, cross-country, road-running (both sexes) as well as team sports (men) were associated with higher well-being. Health, fitness, gym or conditioning activities and jogging, cross-country (women), road-running (women) and team sports (men) were associated with lower psychological distress. Participation in both individual and group PA were associated with lower psychological distress and higher well-being for both sexes in crude models. However, adjusted models revealed that only group PA was associated with lower psychological distress (B: −0.106; 95%CI: −0.188 to −0.025) and higher well-being (0.835; 0.050 to 1.619) among men but not women. In the sensitivity analysis, group PA was associated with higher well-being (0.855; 0.094 to 1.616) when compared with individual PA among men. Group PA was not associated with psychological distress among both sexes and well-being among women when compared with individual PA. Conclusion: Group PA was prospectively associated with lower psychological distress and higher well-being among men but not females. Future PA interventions could focus on group activities for males. Further research to understand the relationship between individual/group PA and mental health is required in females.",
keywords = "Depressive symptoms, Exercise, Mental health, Mood",
author = "Werneck, {Andr{\'e} O} and Brendon Stubbs and Aaron Kandola and Mark Hamer and Silva, {Danilo R}",
note = "Funding Information: This research received no specific grant from any funding agency in the public, commercial, or not-for-profit sectors. Andr{\'e} O. Werneck is supported by the S{\~a}o Paulo Research Foundation (FAPESP) with a PhD scholarship (FAPESP process: 2019/24124-7 ). This paper presents independent research. The views expressed in this publication are those of the authors and not necessarily those of the acknowledged institutions. Publisher Copyright: {\textcopyright} 2021 Elsevier Ltd Copyright: Copyright 2021 Elsevier B.V., All rights reserved.",
year = "2021",
month = aug,
doi = "10.1016/j.jpsychires.2021.05.049",
language = "English",
volume = "140",
pages = "15--21",
journal = "Journal of psychiatric research",
issn = "0022-3956",
publisher = "Elsevier",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Prospective associations of different contexts of physical activity with psychological distress and well-being among middle-aged adults

T2 - An analysis of the 1970 British Cohort Study

AU - Werneck, André O

AU - Stubbs, Brendon

AU - Kandola, Aaron

AU - Hamer, Mark

AU - Silva, Danilo R

N1 - Funding Information: This research received no specific grant from any funding agency in the public, commercial, or not-for-profit sectors. André O. Werneck is supported by the São Paulo Research Foundation (FAPESP) with a PhD scholarship (FAPESP process: 2019/24124-7 ). This paper presents independent research. The views expressed in this publication are those of the authors and not necessarily those of the acknowledged institutions. Publisher Copyright: © 2021 Elsevier Ltd Copyright: Copyright 2021 Elsevier B.V., All rights reserved.

PY - 2021/8

Y1 - 2021/8

N2 - Background: Our aim was to investigate whether different types and social contexts of physical activity (PA) participation are prospectively associated with psychological distress and well-being among middle-aged adults. Methods: Data from the 1970 British Cohort Study was used (N = 5144–2733 women). At age 42y, participants reported their type of leisure-time PA, which was classified as individual PA or group PA (exposure). At age 46y, participants reported co-primary outcomes: psychological distress (Malaise Inventory) and well-being (Warwick-Edinburgh scale). Highest academic achievement, employment status, country of interview, baseline values of psychological distress and well-being, smoking, alcohol use, TV-viewing and total physical activity at 42y were used as covariates. Main analyses included linear regression stratifying by sex. Results: Jogging, cross-country, road-running (both sexes) as well as team sports (men) were associated with higher well-being. Health, fitness, gym or conditioning activities and jogging, cross-country (women), road-running (women) and team sports (men) were associated with lower psychological distress. Participation in both individual and group PA were associated with lower psychological distress and higher well-being for both sexes in crude models. However, adjusted models revealed that only group PA was associated with lower psychological distress (B: −0.106; 95%CI: −0.188 to −0.025) and higher well-being (0.835; 0.050 to 1.619) among men but not women. In the sensitivity analysis, group PA was associated with higher well-being (0.855; 0.094 to 1.616) when compared with individual PA among men. Group PA was not associated with psychological distress among both sexes and well-being among women when compared with individual PA. Conclusion: Group PA was prospectively associated with lower psychological distress and higher well-being among men but not females. Future PA interventions could focus on group activities for males. Further research to understand the relationship between individual/group PA and mental health is required in females.

AB - Background: Our aim was to investigate whether different types and social contexts of physical activity (PA) participation are prospectively associated with psychological distress and well-being among middle-aged adults. Methods: Data from the 1970 British Cohort Study was used (N = 5144–2733 women). At age 42y, participants reported their type of leisure-time PA, which was classified as individual PA or group PA (exposure). At age 46y, participants reported co-primary outcomes: psychological distress (Malaise Inventory) and well-being (Warwick-Edinburgh scale). Highest academic achievement, employment status, country of interview, baseline values of psychological distress and well-being, smoking, alcohol use, TV-viewing and total physical activity at 42y were used as covariates. Main analyses included linear regression stratifying by sex. Results: Jogging, cross-country, road-running (both sexes) as well as team sports (men) were associated with higher well-being. Health, fitness, gym or conditioning activities and jogging, cross-country (women), road-running (women) and team sports (men) were associated with lower psychological distress. Participation in both individual and group PA were associated with lower psychological distress and higher well-being for both sexes in crude models. However, adjusted models revealed that only group PA was associated with lower psychological distress (B: −0.106; 95%CI: −0.188 to −0.025) and higher well-being (0.835; 0.050 to 1.619) among men but not women. In the sensitivity analysis, group PA was associated with higher well-being (0.855; 0.094 to 1.616) when compared with individual PA among men. Group PA was not associated with psychological distress among both sexes and well-being among women when compared with individual PA. Conclusion: Group PA was prospectively associated with lower psychological distress and higher well-being among men but not females. Future PA interventions could focus on group activities for males. Further research to understand the relationship between individual/group PA and mental health is required in females.

KW - Depressive symptoms

KW - Exercise

KW - Mental health

KW - Mood

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85107128719&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.jpsychires.2021.05.049

DO - 10.1016/j.jpsychires.2021.05.049

M3 - Article

C2 - 34087751

AN - SCOPUS:85107128719

VL - 140

SP - 15

EP - 21

JO - Journal of psychiatric research

JF - Journal of psychiatric research

SN - 0022-3956

ER -

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