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Protection against endotoxemia-induced contractile dysfunction in mice with cardiac-specific expression of slow skeletal troponin I

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

J Layland, A C Cave, C Warren, D J Grieve, E Sparks, J C Kentish, R J Solaro, A M Shah

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1137 - 1139
Number of pages3
JournalTHE FASEB JOURNAL : OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF THE FEDERATION OF AMERICAN SOCIETIES FOR EXPERIMENTAL BIOLOGY
Volume19
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2005

King's Authors

Abstract

Gram negative endotoxemia is associated with an intrinsic impairment of cardiomyocyte contraction, in part due to a reduction in myofilament Ca(2+) responsiveness. Endotoxemic rat hearts show increased cardiac troponin I (cTnI) phosphorylation at serines 23 and 24, residues required for the protein kinase A (PKA)-dependent reduction of myofilament Ca(2+) sensitivity after beta-adrenoceptor stimulation. To investigate the functional significance of increased TnI phosphorylation in endotoxemia, we studied the contractile effects of systemic bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) treatment in transgenic mice (TG) with cardiac-specific replacement of cTnI by slow skeletal TnI (ssTnI, which lacks the PKA phosphorylation sites) and matched nontransgenic littermates (NTG) on a CD1 background. In wild-type CD1 mice treated with LPS (6 mg/kg ip), after 16-18 h there was a significant reduction in the maximum rates of left ventricular pressure development and pressure decline in isolated Langendorff-perfused hearts compared with saline-treated controls and a decrease in isolated myocyte unloaded sarcomere shortening from 6.1 +/- 0.2 to 3.9 +/- 0.2% (1 Hz, 32 degrees C, P

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