Quality of life following microsurgery, radiosurgery and conservative management for unilateral vestibular schwannoma

D Sandooram, E A Grunfeld, C Mckinney, M J Gleeson

Research output: Contribution to journalConference paper

69 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The best way to manage small and medium-sized vestibular schwannomas is currently a matter of heated debate. As these tumours are not immediately life-threatening, patients are invariably concerned about how management would affect their quality of life. Until now, no study has compared the three treatment modalities in terms of physical, psychological and social wellbeing. This study is based on a retrospective database analysis and postal questionnaire survey of unilateral vestibular schwannoma patients who had either been managed conservatively, or treated with microsurgery or radiosurgery. The results showed that: quality of life (measured by the Glasgow Benefit Inventory) deteriorated after microsurgery, particularly for small tumours; conservative management did not lead to a change in quality of life, and there was a trend towards poorer quality of life following radiosurgery. The findings suggest that a conservative management approach may be more appropriate for small tumours, and that patients who are due to undergo microsurgery or radiosurgery may benefit from counselling about the potential impact of treatment on quality of life.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)621 - 627
Number of pages7
JournalClinical Otolaryngology
Volume29
Issue number6
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2004
Event4th International Conference on Vestibular Schwannoma and Other Cerebellopontine Angle Lesions - CAMBRIDGE, ENGLAND
Duration: 1 Jan 2004 → …

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