Randomised Controlled Clinical Trial Investigating The Impact of Implementation Planning on Behaviour Related to The Diet

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Abstract

There is a perceived gap between dietary advice given by health practitioners and adherence to the advice by patients. We investigated whether a behaviour change technique (implementation-planning) was more effective than standard-of-care diet advice at reducing dietary acid intake using quantitative erosive tooth wear progression as an objective clinical outcome. This study was a randomised controlled, double-blind, single-centre clinical trial in the UK. Participants (n = 60) with high dietary acid intake (≥2 daily), were recruited and randomly assigned (1:1) to receive either implementation-planning or standard-of-care diet advice in a single clinical session. Questionnaires and impressions were taken at baseline and 6 months later. Dental casts were scanned using laser profilometry and superimposed using surface-matching software. Data were analysed per protocol and intention-to-treat using independent t-tests and Mann-Whitney tests. The intervention group reduced their dietary acid intake between meals to 1 intake per day compared to 2 intakes per day for the controls and demonstrated reduced dental hard tissue volume loss (-0.00 mm3 (SD = 0.01)) compared to controls (-0.07 mm3 (SD 0.17)), p = 0.049. This paper supports the use of implementation planning in clinical practice and presents a non-invasive method of intervention assessment in behaviour change. Larger trials are needed to confirm the generalisability of results.

Original languageEnglish
Article number8024
Number of pages6
JournalScientific Reports
Volume8
Issue number1
Early online date23 May 2018
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 23 May 2018

Keywords

  • Behaviour Change

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