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Real-time fMRI neurofeedback in adolescents with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder

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Real-time fMRI neurofeedback in adolescents with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. / Alegria, Analucia A; Wulff, Melanie; Brinson, Helen; Barker, Gareth J; Norman, Luke J; Brandeis, Daniel; Stahl, Daniel; David, Anthony S; Taylor, Eric; Giampietro, Vincent; Rubia, Katya.

In: Human Brain Mapping, Vol. 38, No. 6, 06.2017, p. 3190-3209.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

Alegria, AA, Wulff, M, Brinson, H, Barker, GJ, Norman, LJ, Brandeis, D, Stahl, D, David, AS, Taylor, E, Giampietro, V & Rubia, K 2017, 'Real-time fMRI neurofeedback in adolescents with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder', Human Brain Mapping, vol. 38, no. 6, pp. 3190-3209. https://doi.org/10.1002/hbm.23584, https://doi.org/10.1002/hbm.23584

APA

Alegria, A. A., Wulff, M., Brinson, H., Barker, G. J., Norman, L. J., Brandeis, D., ... Rubia, K. (2017). Real-time fMRI neurofeedback in adolescents with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. Human Brain Mapping, 38(6), 3190-3209. https://doi.org/10.1002/hbm.23584, https://doi.org/10.1002/hbm.23584

Vancouver

Alegria AA, Wulff M, Brinson H, Barker GJ, Norman LJ, Brandeis D et al. Real-time fMRI neurofeedback in adolescents with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. Human Brain Mapping. 2017 Jun;38(6):3190-3209. https://doi.org/10.1002/hbm.23584, https://doi.org/10.1002/hbm.23584

Author

Alegria, Analucia A ; Wulff, Melanie ; Brinson, Helen ; Barker, Gareth J ; Norman, Luke J ; Brandeis, Daniel ; Stahl, Daniel ; David, Anthony S ; Taylor, Eric ; Giampietro, Vincent ; Rubia, Katya. / Real-time fMRI neurofeedback in adolescents with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. In: Human Brain Mapping. 2017 ; Vol. 38, No. 6. pp. 3190-3209.

Bibtex Download

@article{d161431910554576a7594b47f598dc54,
title = "Real-time fMRI neurofeedback in adolescents with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder",
abstract = "Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is associated with poor self-control, underpinned by inferior fronto-striatal deficits. Real-time functional magnetic resonance neurofeedback (rtfMRI-NF) allows participants to gain self-control over dysregulated brain regions. Despite evidence for beneficial effects of electrophysiological-NF on ADHD symptoms, no study has applied the spatially superior rtfMRI-NF neurotherapy to ADHD. A randomized controlled trial tested the efficacy of rtfMRI-NF of right inferior prefrontal cortex (rIFG), a key region that is compromised in ADHD and upregulated with psychostimulants, on improvement of ADHD symptoms, cognition, and inhibitory fMRI activation. To control for region-specificity, an active control group received rtfMRI-NF of the left parahippocampal gyrus (lPHG). Thirty-one ADHD boys were randomly allocated and had to learn to upregulate their target brain region in an average of 11 rtfMRI-NF runs over 2 weeks. Feedback was provided through a video-clip of a rocket that had to be moved up into space. A transfer session without feedback tested learning retention as a proximal measure of transfer to everyday life. Both NF groups showed significant linear activation increases with increasing number of runs in their respective target regions and significant reduction in ADHD symptoms after neurotherapy and at 11-month follow-up. Only the group targeting rIFG, however, showed a transfer effect, which correlated with ADHD symptom reductions, improved at trend level in sustained attention, and showed increased IFG activation during an inhibitory fMRI task. This proof-of-concept study demonstrates for the first time feasibility, safety, and shorter- and longer-term efficacy of rtfMRI-NF of rIFG in adolescents with ADHD.",
keywords = "ADHD Neurofeedback fMRI Neurofeedback",
author = "Alegria, {Analucia A} and Melanie Wulff and Helen Brinson and Barker, {Gareth J} and Norman, {Luke J} and Daniel Brandeis and Daniel Stahl and David, {Anthony S} and Eric Taylor and Vincent Giampietro and Katya Rubia",
note = "{\circledC} 2017 The Authors Human Brain Mapping Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.",
year = "2017",
month = "6",
doi = "10.1002/hbm.23584",
language = "English",
volume = "38",
pages = "3190--3209",
journal = "Human Brain Mapping",
issn = "1065-9471",
publisher = "Wiley-Liss Inc.",
number = "6",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Real-time fMRI neurofeedback in adolescents with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder

AU - Alegria, Analucia A

AU - Wulff, Melanie

AU - Brinson, Helen

AU - Barker, Gareth J

AU - Norman, Luke J

AU - Brandeis, Daniel

AU - Stahl, Daniel

AU - David, Anthony S

AU - Taylor, Eric

AU - Giampietro, Vincent

AU - Rubia, Katya

N1 - © 2017 The Authors Human Brain Mapping Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

PY - 2017/6

Y1 - 2017/6

N2 - Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is associated with poor self-control, underpinned by inferior fronto-striatal deficits. Real-time functional magnetic resonance neurofeedback (rtfMRI-NF) allows participants to gain self-control over dysregulated brain regions. Despite evidence for beneficial effects of electrophysiological-NF on ADHD symptoms, no study has applied the spatially superior rtfMRI-NF neurotherapy to ADHD. A randomized controlled trial tested the efficacy of rtfMRI-NF of right inferior prefrontal cortex (rIFG), a key region that is compromised in ADHD and upregulated with psychostimulants, on improvement of ADHD symptoms, cognition, and inhibitory fMRI activation. To control for region-specificity, an active control group received rtfMRI-NF of the left parahippocampal gyrus (lPHG). Thirty-one ADHD boys were randomly allocated and had to learn to upregulate their target brain region in an average of 11 rtfMRI-NF runs over 2 weeks. Feedback was provided through a video-clip of a rocket that had to be moved up into space. A transfer session without feedback tested learning retention as a proximal measure of transfer to everyday life. Both NF groups showed significant linear activation increases with increasing number of runs in their respective target regions and significant reduction in ADHD symptoms after neurotherapy and at 11-month follow-up. Only the group targeting rIFG, however, showed a transfer effect, which correlated with ADHD symptom reductions, improved at trend level in sustained attention, and showed increased IFG activation during an inhibitory fMRI task. This proof-of-concept study demonstrates for the first time feasibility, safety, and shorter- and longer-term efficacy of rtfMRI-NF of rIFG in adolescents with ADHD.

AB - Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is associated with poor self-control, underpinned by inferior fronto-striatal deficits. Real-time functional magnetic resonance neurofeedback (rtfMRI-NF) allows participants to gain self-control over dysregulated brain regions. Despite evidence for beneficial effects of electrophysiological-NF on ADHD symptoms, no study has applied the spatially superior rtfMRI-NF neurotherapy to ADHD. A randomized controlled trial tested the efficacy of rtfMRI-NF of right inferior prefrontal cortex (rIFG), a key region that is compromised in ADHD and upregulated with psychostimulants, on improvement of ADHD symptoms, cognition, and inhibitory fMRI activation. To control for region-specificity, an active control group received rtfMRI-NF of the left parahippocampal gyrus (lPHG). Thirty-one ADHD boys were randomly allocated and had to learn to upregulate their target brain region in an average of 11 rtfMRI-NF runs over 2 weeks. Feedback was provided through a video-clip of a rocket that had to be moved up into space. A transfer session without feedback tested learning retention as a proximal measure of transfer to everyday life. Both NF groups showed significant linear activation increases with increasing number of runs in their respective target regions and significant reduction in ADHD symptoms after neurotherapy and at 11-month follow-up. Only the group targeting rIFG, however, showed a transfer effect, which correlated with ADHD symptom reductions, improved at trend level in sustained attention, and showed increased IFG activation during an inhibitory fMRI task. This proof-of-concept study demonstrates for the first time feasibility, safety, and shorter- and longer-term efficacy of rtfMRI-NF of rIFG in adolescents with ADHD.

KW - ADHD Neurofeedback fMRI Neurofeedback

U2 - 10.1002/hbm.23584

DO - 10.1002/hbm.23584

M3 - Article

C2 - 28342214

VL - 38

SP - 3190

EP - 3209

JO - Human Brain Mapping

JF - Human Brain Mapping

SN - 1065-9471

IS - 6

ER -

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