Recent physical and sexual violence against adults with severe mental illness: a systematic review and meta-analysis

Hind Khalifeh*, Siân Oram, David Osborn, Louise M. Howard, Sonia Johnson

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

80 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

People with severe mental illness (SMI) have high prevalence of lifetime victimization, but little is known about the extent and risk of recent domestic/sexual violence. The objective was to synthesize evidence on prevalence, odds, and risk factors for recent violence against people with SMI, with a focus on domestic and sexual violence. Relevant studies were identified through literature searches in Medline, Psychinf, Embase (for studies published in 2010–2015), and through existing systematic reviews (for studies published in 2000–2014). The review included 30 studies (with 16 140 SMI participants), including six on domestic violence and 11 on sexual violence. Prevalence of recent domestic violence ranged from 15–22% among women and from 4–10% among men/mixed samples; with little evidence on risk compared with the general population. Median prevalence of sexual violence was 9.9% (IQR = 5.9–18.1%) in women and 3.1% (IQR = 2.5–6.7%) in men; with 6-fold higher odds of victimization compared with the general population. There was little evidence on risk factors for domestic or sexual violence. In conclusion, people with SMI have a high prevalence of recent domestic and sexual violence, but little is known about risk factors for these violence types, or extent of domestic violence victimization compared to the general population.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)433-451
Number of pages19
JournalInternational Review of Psychiatry
Volume28
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2 Sept 2016

Keywords

  • mental illness
  • systematic review
  • victim
  • Violence

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