Reinsertion Assistance and the Reintegration of Ex-Combatants in War to Peace Transitions. Thematic Working Paper 4.

Sukanya Podder, Alp Ozerdem

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Abstract

The disarmament, demobilization and reintegration (DDR) of former combatants constitutes one of the most crucial activities in a post-conflict peacebuilding context with important effects upon the wider transitional process from war to peace. The efficient implementation of DDR programmes can reassure belligerent parties of the possibility of a permanent cessation of hostilities, as they are often the most visible element of the peace agreement. Moreover, a wellplanned and flexible reintegration process can also promote the viability of long-term peace locally, nationally and internationally. 1 Since the end of the Cold War, DDR initiatives have been undertaken in more than 25 war-to-peace transition contexts: Afghanistan, Aceh, Angola, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Cambodia, the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), El Salvador, Eritrea, East Timor, Ethiopia, Guatemala, Haiti, Ivory Coast, Kosovo, Liberia, Mindanao, Mozambique, Nicaragua, Rwanda, Sierra Leone, Sudan, Tajikistan and Uganda. In 2007, over 1,129,000 combatants were taking part in DDR programmes in 20 countries at an estimated cost of US $2 billion; one estimate suggests that it worked out to be around US $1,686 per excombatant. Some 2/3 of former combatants were from African countries; 42% were members of the armed forces and 58% belonged to armed militias, guerrilla groups and paramilitary groups. Of this statistic, nearly 10% were child soldiers
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationReinsertion Assistance and the Reintegration of Ex-Combatants in War to Peace Transitions
Place of PublicationBradford
PublisherUniversity of Bradford
Number of pages42
ISBN (Electronic)http://hdl.handle.net/10454/7311
Publication statusPublished - 2008

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