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Relative risk of functional dyspepsia in patients with sleep disturbance: a population-based cohort study

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Hsu Han Su, Fung Chang Sung, Kai Liang Kao, Shu Chin Chen, Chen Ju Lin, Shu I. Wu, Cheng Li Lin, Robert Stewart, Yi Shin Chen

Original languageEnglish
Article number18605
JournalScientific Reports
Volume11
Issue number1
DOIs
PublishedDec 2021

Bibliographical note

Funding Information: This series of study received funding from the Bureau of Health Promotion, Department of Health, R.O.C. (Taiwan) (DOH99-HP-1205); the Taiwan Ministry of Health and Welfare Clinical Trial and Research Center of Excellence (MOHW104-TDU-B-212-113002); China Medical University Hospital; Academia Sinica Taiwan Biobank; Stroke Biosignature Project (BM104010092); NRPB Stroke Clinical Trial Consortium (MOST 103-2325-B-039 -006); Tseng-Lien Lin Foundation, Taichung, Taiwan; Brain Disease Foundation, Taipei, Taiwan; and Katsuzo and Kiyo Aoshima Memorial Funds, Japan. RS is part-funded by: (i) the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Biomedical Research Centre at South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust and King’s College London (ii) an NIHR Senior Investigator Award; (iii) the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Applied Research Collaboration South London (NIHR ARC South London) at King’s College Hospital NHS Foundation Trust. RS declares research support received in the last 36 months from Janssen, GSK and Takeda. SI is part-funded by Department of Medical Research, Mackay Memorial Hospital (MMH-109112, MMH-10914, MMH-108121, MMH-108146, MMH-TT-10804, MMH-TH-10804). The funders had no role in study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript. Funding Information: This study is based in part on data from the National Health Insurance Research Database provided by the Bureau of National Health Insurance, Department of Health and managed by the Taiwan National Health Research Institutes, the Republic of China. As well as the Bureau of Health Promotion, Department of Health, R.O.C. (Taiwan) (DOH99-HP-1205); the Taiwan Ministry of Health and Welfare Clinical Trial and Research Center of Excellence (MOHW104-TDU-B-212-113002); China Medical University Hospital; Academia Sinica Taiwan Biobank; Stroke Biosignature Project (BM104010092); NRPB Stroke Clinical Trial Consortium (MOST 103-2325-B-039 -006); Tseng-Lien Lin Foundation, Taichung, Taiwan; Brain Disease Foundation, Taipei, Taiwan; and Katsuzo and Kiyo Aoshima Memorial Funds, Japan. The interpretation and conclusions contained herein do not represent those of Bureau of National Health Insurance, Department of Health or National Health Research Institutes. RS is part-funded by: (i) the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Biomedical Research Centre at South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust and King’s College London (ii) an NIHR Senior Investigator Award; (iii) the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Applied Research Collaboration South London (NIHR ARC South London) at King’s College Hospital NHS Foundation Trust. Publisher Copyright: © 2021, The Author(s). Copyright: Copyright 2021 Elsevier B.V., All rights reserved.

King's Authors

Abstract

Increased prevalence of sleep disorders has been found in patients with functional dyspepsia; however, direction of causality remains unclear. Our aim was to compare the risk of incident functional dyspepsia between patients with and without sleep disturbance from a large population-based sample. Utilizing a nation-wide health insurance administrative dataset, we assembled an 11-year historic cohort study to compare subsequent incidence of diagnosed functional dyspepsia between adult patients with any diagnosis of sleep disturbance and age- and gender-matched controls. Hazard ratios adjusted for other relevant comorbidities and medications were calculated using Cox regression models. 45,310 patients with sleep disorder and 90,620 controls were compared. Patients with sleep apnea had a 3.3-fold (95% confidence interval: 2.82 ~ 3.89) increased hazard of functional dyspepsia compared with controls. This increased risk persisted regardless of previously diagnosed depression coexisted. Sleep disturbance was associated with an increased risk of subsequent functional dyspepsia. Potential mechanisms are discussed.

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