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Respiratory monitoring during less invasive surfactant administration in the delivery suite

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Hemant Ambulkar, Emma Williams, Ann Hickey, Ravindra Bhat, Theodore Dassios, Anne Greenough

Original languageEnglish
Article numberPMID: 33497953
JournalEarly Human Development
Volume154
Published2020

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Abstract

ABSTRACT Background: On the neonatal unit less invasive surfactant administration (LISA) reduces BPD and the need for mechanical ventilation Aims: To evaluate the feasibility of LISA in the delivery suite and to undertake respiratory function physiological monitoring before and after LISA. Study design: A prospective, observational cohort study was undertaken. A LISA simulation training programme was delivered. Then, LISA was undertaken in infants with respiratory distress maintained on continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) in the delivery suite using videolaryngoscopic guidance without sedation. Subjects: Thirty-eight infants with a median (IQR) gestational age of 31+5 weeks (30+3-33+4) and birth weight of 1.61 (1.42-1.90) kg had LISA in the delivery suite. Outcome measures: Adverse effects of LISA and whether LISA resulted in changes in tidal and minute volumes, end tidal carbon dioxide (EtCO2) levels and the inspired oxygen concentration (FiO2). Results: Respiratory function monitoring was available for 34 of the infants. LISA occurred at a median (IQR) interval of 18 (15-29) minutes after birth. The most common adverse events were desaturation (44.7%) and surfactant reflux (39.5%), both responded to either temporary suspension of LISA or slowing the speed of surfactant administration. Following LISA, there was a significant reduction in respiratory rate two minutes later (p<0.001) and in the FiO2 two hours later (p<0.001). Conclusions: LISA is feasible in the delivery suite after appropriate training of staff. It can be undertaken without serious adverse effects and results in a reduction in respiratory distress and improvement in oxygenation.

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