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Resuscitation of infants with congenital diaphragmatic hernia

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Anthony O'Rourke-Potocki, Kamal Ali, Vadivelam Murthy, Anthony Milner, Anne Greenough

Original languageEnglish
Number of pages5
JournalADC Fetal & Neonatal
Early online date5 Dec 2016
DOIs
Accepted/In press10 Nov 2016
E-pub ahead of print5 Dec 2016

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Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To determine whether the respiratory response to resuscitation in infants with congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) as measured by a respiratory function monitor differed between those who did and did not survive.

DESIGN: Observational study.

SETTING: Tertiary perinatal centre.

PATIENTS: Thirty-eight infants born at 34 weeks of gestation or greater and diagnosed antenatally with a CDH.

INTERVENTIONS: Expiratory tidal volume (VTe), peak inflation pressure (PIP) and end-tidal carbon dioxide level (ETCO2) were simultaneously recorded during resuscitation using a respiratory function monitor. Oxygen saturation was also monitored.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Mortality related to the median VTe, PIP, compliance (VTe divided by PIP) and ETCO2 levels in the first and last minute of recorded resuscitation and the maximum oxygen saturation.

RESULTS: The median gestational age, birth weight and duration of resuscitation of the 11 infants who died did not differ significantly from those who survived. During the first minute of recorded resuscitation, the VTe (median 1.89 vs 2.68 mL/kg) (p=0.009)), the ETCO2 (median 11.7 vs 41.7 mm Hg) (p=0.023)) and the compliance (0.06 vs 0.08 mL/cm H2O/kg) (p=0.018)) were lower in the non-survivors. In the last minute, the PIP was higher (32.5 vs 30.3 cm H2O) (p=0.03)), the VTe (3.22 vs 4.66 mL/kg) (p=0.003)) and compliance (0.10 vs 0.15 mL/cm H2O/kg) (p=0.004)) were lower in the non-survivors. The maximum oxygen saturation achieved in the labour suite was lower in the non-survivors (93% vs 100%) (p=0.037).

CONCLUSIONS: Infants with CDH who did not survive responded less well even to initial resuscitation.

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