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Revealing differences in anatomical remodelling of the systemic right ventricle

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference paper

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationLecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics)
PublisherSpringer‐Verlag Berlin Heidelberg
Pages99-107
Number of pages9
Volume9126
ISBN (Print)9783319203089, 9783319203089
DOIs
StatePublished - 21 Jun 2015
Event8th International Conference on Functional Imaging and Modeling of the Heart, FIMH 2015 - Maastricht, Netherlands
Duration: 25 Jun 201527 Jun 2015

Publication series

NameLecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics)
Volume9126
ISSN (Print)03029743
ISSN (Electronic)16113349

Conference

Conference8th International Conference on Functional Imaging and Modeling of the Heart, FIMH 2015
CountryNetherlands
CityMaastricht
Period25/06/201527/06/2015

King's Authors

Abstract

Cardiac remodelling, which refers to the change of the shape and size of the myocardium, is an adaptive response to developmental, disease and surgical processes. Traditional metrics of length, volume, aspect ratio or wall thickness are used in the clinic and in medical research, but have limited capabilities to describe complex structures such as the shape of cardiac ventricles. In this work we present an example of how computational analysis of cardiac anatomy can reveal more detailed description of developmental and remodelling patterns. The clinical problem is the analysis of the impact of two different surgical palliation techniques for hypoplastic left heart syndrome. Construction of a computational atlas and the statistical description of its variability are performed from the short axis stack of 128 subjects. Results unveil, for the first time in the literature, the differences in remodelling of the systemic right ventricle depending on the surgical palliation technique.

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