RSV hospitalisation and healthcare utilisation in moderately prematurely born infants

Deena Shefali-Patel, Mireia Alcazar Paris, Fran Watson, Janet L. Peacock, Morag Campbell, Anne Greenough*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

26 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection is associated with chronic respiratory morbidity in infants born very prematurely. Our aims were to determine if infants born moderately prematurely (32–35 weeks of gestation) who had had an RSV hospitalisation, compared to those who had not, had greater healthcare utilisation and related cost of care in the first 2 years. Two thousand and sixty-six eligible infants’ records were examined to identify three groups: 20 infants admitted for an RSV lower respiratory tract infection (RSV), 30 admitted for another respiratory problem (other respiratory) and 108 admitted for a non-respiratory problem/never admitted (non-respiratory). Healthcare utilisation was assessed by examining hospital and general practitioner records and cost of care calculated using the National Scheme of Reference costs and the British National Formulary prices. The mean cost of care in the RSV group (£12,505) was greater than the non-respiratory (£1,178) (95% CI for difference £5,015 to £17,639, p = 0.002) and the other respiratory (£3,356) groups (95% CI for difference £2,963 to £15,606, p < 0.001). The adjusted mean differences in the cost of care were £11,186 between the RSV and non-respiratory groups (95% CI £4,763 to £17,609) and £9,076 (95% CI £2,515 to £15,637) between the RSV and the other respiratory groups. Forty-two of 2,066 eligible infants had an RSV hospitalisation (2%); thus, assuming prophylaxis would reduce the hospitalisation rate by 50%, the number needed to treat was 98. In conclusion, RSV hospitalisation in moderately prematurely born infants is associated with increased health-related cost of care. Nevertheless, if RSV prophylaxis is to be cost-effective, a high risk group of moderately prematurely born infants needs to be identified.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1055-1061
Number of pages7
JournalEuropean Journal of Pediatrics
Volume171
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2012

Keywords

  • OUTCOMES
  • PALIVIZUMAB
  • Respiratory syncytial virus
  • RESPIRATORY SYNCYTIAL VIRUS
  • MORBIDITY
  • INFECTION
  • Prematurity
  • ASTHMA
  • HIGH-RISK CHILDREN
  • Cost of care
  • RHINOVIRUS ILLNESSES

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'RSV hospitalisation and healthcare utilisation in moderately prematurely born infants'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this