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Scalable multimodal convolutional networks for brain tumour segmentation

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference paper

Lucas Fidon, Wenqi Li, Luis C. Garcia-Peraza-Herrera, Jinendra Ekanayake, Neil Kitchen, Sebastien Ourselin, Tom Vercauteren

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationMedical Image Computing and Computer Assisted Intervention − MICCAI 2017 - 20th International Conference, Proceedings
PublisherSpringer Verlag
Pages285-293
Number of pages9
Volume10435
ISBN (Print)9783319661780
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017
Event20th International Conference on Medical Image Computing and Computer-Assisted Intervention, MICCAI 2017 - Quebec City, Canada
Duration: 11 Sep 201713 Sep 2017

Publication series

NameLecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics)
Volume10435 LNCS
ISSN (Print)0302-9743
ISSN (Electronic)1611-3349

Conference

Conference20th International Conference on Medical Image Computing and Computer-Assisted Intervention, MICCAI 2017
CountryCanada
CityQuebec City
Period11/09/201713/09/2017

King's Authors

Abstract

Brain tumour segmentation plays a key role in computer-assisted surgery. Deep neural networks have increased the accuracy of automatic segmentation significantly, however these models tend to generalise poorly to different imaging modalities than those for which they have been designed, thereby limiting their applications. For example, a network architecture initially designed for brain parcellation of monomodal T1 MRI can not be easily translated into an efficient tumour segmentation network that jointly utilises T1, T1c, Flair and T2 MRI. To tackle this, we propose a novel scalable multimodal deep learning architecture using new nested structures that explicitly leverage deep features within or across modalities. This aims at making the early layers of the architecture structured and sparse so that the final architecture becomes scalable to the number of modalities. We evaluate the scalable architecture for brain tumour segmentation and give evidence of its regularisation effect compared to the conventional concatenation approach.

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