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Secret wires across the mediterranean: The club de berne, Euro-Israeli counterterrorism, and Swiss ‘Neutrality’

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Secret wires across the mediterranean : The club de berne, Euro-Israeli counterterrorism, and Swiss ‘Neutrality’. / Guttmann, Aviva.

In: INTERNATIONAL HISTORY REVIEW, Vol. 40, No. 4, 08.08.2018, p. 814-833.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

Guttmann, A 2018, 'Secret wires across the mediterranean: The club de berne, Euro-Israeli counterterrorism, and Swiss ‘Neutrality’', INTERNATIONAL HISTORY REVIEW, vol. 40, no. 4, pp. 814-833. https://doi.org/10.1080/07075332.2017.1345774

APA

Guttmann, A. (2018). Secret wires across the mediterranean: The club de berne, Euro-Israeli counterterrorism, and Swiss ‘Neutrality’. INTERNATIONAL HISTORY REVIEW, 40(4), 814-833. https://doi.org/10.1080/07075332.2017.1345774

Vancouver

Guttmann A. Secret wires across the mediterranean: The club de berne, Euro-Israeli counterterrorism, and Swiss ‘Neutrality’. INTERNATIONAL HISTORY REVIEW. 2018 Aug 8;40(4):814-833. https://doi.org/10.1080/07075332.2017.1345774

Author

Guttmann, Aviva. / Secret wires across the mediterranean : The club de berne, Euro-Israeli counterterrorism, and Swiss ‘Neutrality’. In: INTERNATIONAL HISTORY REVIEW. 2018 ; Vol. 40, No. 4. pp. 814-833.

Bibtex Download

@article{95a6e3a38f7549a9b3bbb1fc258a54ae,
title = "Secret wires across the mediterranean: The club de berne, Euro-Israeli counterterrorism, and Swiss {\textquoteleft}Neutrality{\textquoteright}",
abstract = "This article sheds light on a covert counterterrorist deal between the Western European and Israeli security services, which was concluded in 1971 under the auspices of the Swiss government. This security arrangement was held under the framework of the Club de Berne, an informal forum of nine Western security services and their transatlantic and Middle Eastern partners. Based on hitherto unknown source material, the article discusses four main aspects of the Club de Berne: its creation, its background within the Swiss administration (complete lack of democratic oversight, absolute secrecy and neutrality), its threat warning system under the code word Kilowatt and the reasons for the participating countries to choose cooperation within this network. The main argument is that the Club de Berne was a security arrangement beneficial to all parties: it allowed Europeans to protect themselves from Palestinian terrorism without being seen as helping Israel; this secret dimension was also what allowed {\textquoteleft}neutral{\textquoteright} Switzerland to take part in this security framework.",
keywords = "Arab-Israeli conflict, Club de Berne, Cold War history, Counterterrorism intelligence-sharing, Europe-Middle east security collaboration, Kilowatt, Multilateral antiterrorism cooperation, Neutrality and neutralism, Palestinian terrorism",
author = "Aviva Guttmann",
year = "2018",
month = aug,
day = "8",
doi = "10.1080/07075332.2017.1345774",
language = "English",
volume = "40",
pages = "814--833",
journal = "INTERNATIONAL HISTORY REVIEW",
issn = "0707-5332",
publisher = "Taylor and Francis Ltd.",
number = "4",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Secret wires across the mediterranean

T2 - The club de berne, Euro-Israeli counterterrorism, and Swiss ‘Neutrality’

AU - Guttmann, Aviva

PY - 2018/8/8

Y1 - 2018/8/8

N2 - This article sheds light on a covert counterterrorist deal between the Western European and Israeli security services, which was concluded in 1971 under the auspices of the Swiss government. This security arrangement was held under the framework of the Club de Berne, an informal forum of nine Western security services and their transatlantic and Middle Eastern partners. Based on hitherto unknown source material, the article discusses four main aspects of the Club de Berne: its creation, its background within the Swiss administration (complete lack of democratic oversight, absolute secrecy and neutrality), its threat warning system under the code word Kilowatt and the reasons for the participating countries to choose cooperation within this network. The main argument is that the Club de Berne was a security arrangement beneficial to all parties: it allowed Europeans to protect themselves from Palestinian terrorism without being seen as helping Israel; this secret dimension was also what allowed ‘neutral’ Switzerland to take part in this security framework.

AB - This article sheds light on a covert counterterrorist deal between the Western European and Israeli security services, which was concluded in 1971 under the auspices of the Swiss government. This security arrangement was held under the framework of the Club de Berne, an informal forum of nine Western security services and their transatlantic and Middle Eastern partners. Based on hitherto unknown source material, the article discusses four main aspects of the Club de Berne: its creation, its background within the Swiss administration (complete lack of democratic oversight, absolute secrecy and neutrality), its threat warning system under the code word Kilowatt and the reasons for the participating countries to choose cooperation within this network. The main argument is that the Club de Berne was a security arrangement beneficial to all parties: it allowed Europeans to protect themselves from Palestinian terrorism without being seen as helping Israel; this secret dimension was also what allowed ‘neutral’ Switzerland to take part in this security framework.

KW - Arab-Israeli conflict

KW - Club de Berne

KW - Cold War history

KW - Counterterrorism intelligence-sharing

KW - Europe-Middle east security collaboration

KW - Kilowatt

KW - Multilateral antiterrorism cooperation

KW - Neutrality and neutralism

KW - Palestinian terrorism

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U2 - 10.1080/07075332.2017.1345774

DO - 10.1080/07075332.2017.1345774

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:85022197795

VL - 40

SP - 814

EP - 833

JO - INTERNATIONAL HISTORY REVIEW

JF - INTERNATIONAL HISTORY REVIEW

SN - 0707-5332

IS - 4

ER -

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