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Service users’ experiences of mental health tribunals in Ireland: a qualitative analysis

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Service users’ experiences of mental health tribunals in Ireland : a qualitative analysis. / Murphy, R.; Mcguinness, D.; Bainbridge, E.; Brosnan, L.; Keys, M.; Felzmann, H.; Murphy, K.; Hallahan, B.; Higgins, A.; Mcdonald, C.

In: Irish Journal of Psychological Medicine, 15.06.2017, p. 1-10.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Harvard

Murphy, R, Mcguinness, D, Bainbridge, E, Brosnan, L, Keys, M, Felzmann, H, Murphy, K, Hallahan, B, Higgins, A & Mcdonald, C 2017, 'Service users’ experiences of mental health tribunals in Ireland: a qualitative analysis', Irish Journal of Psychological Medicine, pp. 1-10. https://doi.org/10.1017/ipm.2017.11

APA

Murphy, R., Mcguinness, D., Bainbridge, E., Brosnan, L., Keys, M., Felzmann, H., Murphy, K., Hallahan, B., Higgins, A., & Mcdonald, C. (2017). Service users’ experiences of mental health tribunals in Ireland: a qualitative analysis. Irish Journal of Psychological Medicine, 1-10. https://doi.org/10.1017/ipm.2017.11

Vancouver

Murphy R, Mcguinness D, Bainbridge E, Brosnan L, Keys M, Felzmann H et al. Service users’ experiences of mental health tribunals in Ireland: a qualitative analysis. Irish Journal of Psychological Medicine. 2017 Jun 15;1-10. https://doi.org/10.1017/ipm.2017.11

Author

Murphy, R. ; Mcguinness, D. ; Bainbridge, E. ; Brosnan, L. ; Keys, M. ; Felzmann, H. ; Murphy, K. ; Hallahan, B. ; Higgins, A. ; Mcdonald, C. / Service users’ experiences of mental health tribunals in Ireland : a qualitative analysis. In: Irish Journal of Psychological Medicine. 2017 ; pp. 1-10.

Bibtex Download

@article{0a04453b48a0427fa1e7d1851626cc83,
title = "Service users{\textquoteright} experiences of mental health tribunals in Ireland: a qualitative analysis",
abstract = "Objectives. To explore the mental health tribunal experiences of people admitted involuntarily under the Mental HealthAct 2001.Methods. Employing a qualitative descriptive study design, data were collected from23 service users who had experiencedmental health tribunals during a recent involuntary admission. Face-to-face semi-structured interviews were conducted~3 months post-revocation of their involuntary admission order. Data were analysed using an inductive thematic process.Results. The majority of participants reported mixed experiences comprising positive and negative aspects in relation toinformation provision, emotional support and an inclusive atmosphere. Some participants reported receiving accessibleinformation about the tribunal process, felt emotionally supported throughout, and encountered respectful and dignifyingpractices during the tribunal proceedings. However, many participants described experiencing non-inclusivepractices, reported feeling ill-informed regarding the tribunal process, emotionally unsupported during and after thetribunal, and distressed by what they perceived as adversarial tribunal proceedings.Conclusions. Systemic changes could ensure that the positive experiences encountered by the minority of participants inthis study are more consistently experienced. Ongoing education and training of stakeholders in the provision of inclusivetribunal practices, and the provision of accessible information and emotional support to service users through the stagesof the involuntary admission process appear likely to be beneficial. Service users should automatically be offered theoption of having a support person of their choosing present during tribunals.",
author = "R. Murphy and D. Mcguinness and E. Bainbridge and L. Brosnan and M. Keys and H. Felzmann and K. Murphy and B. Hallahan and A. Higgins and C. Mcdonald",
year = "2017",
month = jun,
day = "15",
doi = "10.1017/ipm.2017.11",
language = "English",
pages = "1--10",
journal = "Irish Journal of Psychological Medicine",
issn = "0790-9667",
publisher = "MedMedia Ltd",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Service users’ experiences of mental health tribunals in Ireland

T2 - a qualitative analysis

AU - Murphy, R.

AU - Mcguinness, D.

AU - Bainbridge, E.

AU - Brosnan, L.

AU - Keys, M.

AU - Felzmann, H.

AU - Murphy, K.

AU - Hallahan, B.

AU - Higgins, A.

AU - Mcdonald, C.

PY - 2017/6/15

Y1 - 2017/6/15

N2 - Objectives. To explore the mental health tribunal experiences of people admitted involuntarily under the Mental HealthAct 2001.Methods. Employing a qualitative descriptive study design, data were collected from23 service users who had experiencedmental health tribunals during a recent involuntary admission. Face-to-face semi-structured interviews were conducted~3 months post-revocation of their involuntary admission order. Data were analysed using an inductive thematic process.Results. The majority of participants reported mixed experiences comprising positive and negative aspects in relation toinformation provision, emotional support and an inclusive atmosphere. Some participants reported receiving accessibleinformation about the tribunal process, felt emotionally supported throughout, and encountered respectful and dignifyingpractices during the tribunal proceedings. However, many participants described experiencing non-inclusivepractices, reported feeling ill-informed regarding the tribunal process, emotionally unsupported during and after thetribunal, and distressed by what they perceived as adversarial tribunal proceedings.Conclusions. Systemic changes could ensure that the positive experiences encountered by the minority of participants inthis study are more consistently experienced. Ongoing education and training of stakeholders in the provision of inclusivetribunal practices, and the provision of accessible information and emotional support to service users through the stagesof the involuntary admission process appear likely to be beneficial. Service users should automatically be offered theoption of having a support person of their choosing present during tribunals.

AB - Objectives. To explore the mental health tribunal experiences of people admitted involuntarily under the Mental HealthAct 2001.Methods. Employing a qualitative descriptive study design, data were collected from23 service users who had experiencedmental health tribunals during a recent involuntary admission. Face-to-face semi-structured interviews were conducted~3 months post-revocation of their involuntary admission order. Data were analysed using an inductive thematic process.Results. The majority of participants reported mixed experiences comprising positive and negative aspects in relation toinformation provision, emotional support and an inclusive atmosphere. Some participants reported receiving accessibleinformation about the tribunal process, felt emotionally supported throughout, and encountered respectful and dignifyingpractices during the tribunal proceedings. However, many participants described experiencing non-inclusivepractices, reported feeling ill-informed regarding the tribunal process, emotionally unsupported during and after thetribunal, and distressed by what they perceived as adversarial tribunal proceedings.Conclusions. Systemic changes could ensure that the positive experiences encountered by the minority of participants inthis study are more consistently experienced. Ongoing education and training of stakeholders in the provision of inclusivetribunal practices, and the provision of accessible information and emotional support to service users through the stagesof the involuntary admission process appear likely to be beneficial. Service users should automatically be offered theoption of having a support person of their choosing present during tribunals.

U2 - 10.1017/ipm.2017.11

DO - 10.1017/ipm.2017.11

M3 - Article

SP - 1

EP - 10

JO - Irish Journal of Psychological Medicine

JF - Irish Journal of Psychological Medicine

SN - 0790-9667

ER -

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