Short sleep and social jetlag are associated with higher intakes of non-milk extrinsic sugars, and social jetlag is associated with lower fibre intakes in those with adequate sleep duration: a cross-sectional analysis from the National Diet and Nutrition Survey rolling programme (Years 1-9)

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Abstract

Objective: To investigate associations and interactions between sleep duration and social jetlag status with nutrient intake, nutrient status, body composition and cardio-metabolic risk factors in a nationally representative UK adult population. Design: A cross-sectional study using 4-d food diary and self-reported sleep data from the UK National Diet and Nutrition Survey Rolling Programme 2008-2017. Setting: UK free-living population. Subjects: Totally, 5015 adults aged 19-64 years. Results: Thirty-four per cent were short sleepers (< 7 h); 7 % slept ≥ 9 h; 14 % had > 2 h difference in average sleep duration between weeknights and weekend nights (social jetlag). Compared to those reporting optimal sleep duration (≥ 7-< 9 h), short sleep was associated with higher intakes of non-milk extrinsic sugars (NMES) (0·9 % energy, 95 % CI: 0·4, 1·4), total carbohydrate (0·8 % energy, 95 % CI: 0·2, 1·4) and a lower non-starch polysaccharides fibre intake (-0·5 g/d, 95 % CI -0·8, -0·2). There was a significant interaction between short sleep and social jetlag for fibre intakes, where adequate sleepers with social jetlag as well as all short sleepers (regardless of social jetlag) had lower fibre intakes than adequate sleepers with no social jetlag. Short sleep, but not social jetlag, was associated with greater adiposity, but there were no differences in other markers of cardiometabolic disease risk. Conclusions: The present study reports that both short sleep and social jetlag are associated with higher intakes of NMES, but only sleep duration is associated with markers of adiposity. Social jetlag was associated with lower fibre intakes even in individuals with adequate weekly sleep duration, suggesting catch-up sleep does not prevent the adverse impact of irregular sleep habits on food choices.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2570-2581
Number of pages12
JournalPublic Health Nutrition
Volume25
Issue number9
Early online date18 Jan 2022
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 18 Sept 2022

Keywords

  • diet
  • sleep
  • social jetlag
  • adiposity

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