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Sintered Silver Die Attach with Extreme Thermal Stability for Extreme and Dynamic Environments

Research output: Contribution to journalConference paper

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)168-176
Number of pages9
JournalIMAPS Additional Conferences (Device Packaging, HiTEC, HiTEN, & CICMT)
Volume2017
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 10 Jul 2017
EventHigh Temperature Electronics Network (HiTEN 2017) - Queen's College, Cambridge, United Kingdom
Duration: 10 Jul 201712 Jul 2017
http://www.imaps.org/hiten/

King's Authors

Abstract

The surface oxidation of internal pore surfaces of nano-scale sintered silver has increased stability for high temperature applications. After treatment, high temperature storage at 400 °C has resulted in no changes to microstructure. By contrast, it is known that the microstructure of untreated pressure-less sintered silver continuously evolves at temperatures above 200 °C. Grain and pore growth occur in this temperature range for conventional sintered silver resulting in coarsening of the microstructure and increased susceptibility to fatigue. However, oxidation treatment of the internal pore surfaces has the effect of freezing the microstructure when the contact metallization is also silver or chemically inert. Oxidation prevents mass transfer by shutting down the fastest atomic migration route along the internal pore surfaces. Samples exhibited no change in microstructure either through continuous observation through glass, or after cross sectioning. The tested specimens under high temperature storage resisted grain growth for the whole duration of the tests of more than 600 h at 300 °C. The only detectable changes in microstructure occurred in a sparse number of isolated grains (1 in 7000 grains), presumably due to non-penetration of oxidising treatment into these closed pore spaces. It is hypothesized that even these can be prevented by minor changes to the sintering paste to slightly increase initial porosity. The oxidising treatment can be performed via many different routes, such as exposure to steam, or even by dipping in water for 10 min.

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