Sit-to-walk and sit-to-stand-and-walk task dynamics are maintained during rising at an elevated seat-height independent of lead-limb in healthy individuals

Gareth D. Jones*, Darren C. James, Michael Thacker, Eleanor Jones, David A. Green

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

14 Citations (Scopus)
185 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Introduction: Sit-to-walk (STW) is a common transitional motor task not usually included in rehabilitation. Typically, sit-to-stand (STS), pause, then gait initiation (GI) before walking is used, which we term sit-to-stand-and-walk (STSW). Separation between centre-of-pressure (COP) and whole-body centre-of-mass (BCOM) during GI is associated with dynamic postural stability. Rising from seats higher than knee-height (KH) is more achievable for patients, but whether this and/or lead-limb significantly affects task dynamics is unclear. This study tested whether rising from seat-heights and lead-limb affects STW and STSW task dynamics in young healthy individuals. Methods: Ten (5F) young (29 ± 7.7 years) participants performed STW and STSW from a standardised position. Five trials of each task were completed at 100 and 120%KH leading with dominant and non-dominant legs. Four force-plates and optical motion capture delineated key movement events and phases with effect of seat-height and lead-limb determined by 2-way ANOVA within tasks. Results: At 120%KH, lower peak vertical ground-reaction-forces (vGRFs) and vertical BCOM velocities were observed during rising irrespective of lead-limb. No other parameters differed between seat-heights or lead-limbs. During GI in STSW there was more lateral, and less posterior, COP excursion than expected. Conclusion: Reduction in vGRFs and velocity during rising at 120%KH is consistent with reduced effort in young healthy individuals and is likely therefore to be an appropriate seat-height for patients. Lead-limb had no effect upon STSW or STW parameters suggesting that normative data independent of lead-limb can be utilised to monitor motor rehabilitation should differences be observed in patients. STSW should be considered an independent movement transition.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)226-229
Number of pages4
JournalGait & posture
Volume48
Early online date7 Jun 2016
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jul 2016

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Sit-to-walk and sit-to-stand-and-walk task dynamics are maintained during rising at an elevated seat-height independent of lead-limb in healthy individuals'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this