King's College London

Research portal

Social moral reasoning in adults with ADHD: A pilot study

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Standard

Social moral reasoning in adults with ADHD: A pilot study. / Thomason, Kate Elizabeth; Gudjonsson, Gisli; German, Elaine; Morris, Robin Guy; Young, Susan Jane.

In: AIMS Public Health, Vol. 1, No. 3, 07.08.2014, p. 147-159.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

Thomason, KE, Gudjonsson, G, German, E, Morris, RG & Young, SJ 2014, 'Social moral reasoning in adults with ADHD: A pilot study', AIMS Public Health, vol. 1, no. 3, pp. 147-159. https://doi.org/10.3934/publichealth.2014.3.147

APA

Thomason, K. E., Gudjonsson, G., German, E., Morris, R. G., & Young, S. J. (2014). Social moral reasoning in adults with ADHD: A pilot study. AIMS Public Health, 1(3), 147-159. https://doi.org/10.3934/publichealth.2014.3.147

Vancouver

Thomason KE, Gudjonsson G, German E, Morris RG, Young SJ. Social moral reasoning in adults with ADHD: A pilot study. AIMS Public Health. 2014 Aug 7;1(3):147-159. https://doi.org/10.3934/publichealth.2014.3.147

Author

Thomason, Kate Elizabeth ; Gudjonsson, Gisli ; German, Elaine ; Morris, Robin Guy ; Young, Susan Jane. / Social moral reasoning in adults with ADHD: A pilot study. In: AIMS Public Health. 2014 ; Vol. 1, No. 3. pp. 147-159.

Bibtex Download

@article{4dec1076560949999914d8ed0ef46309,
title = "Social moral reasoning in adults with ADHD: A pilot study",
abstract = "Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is frequently linked with antisocial behaviour, yet less is known about its relationship with sociomoral reasoning, and the possible mediating effect of intelligence. A pilot study was designed to investigate the relationship between antisocial personality traits, intelligence and sociomoral reasoning in adults with ADHD. Twenty two adults with ADHD and 21 healthy controls, matched for age, gender and IQ completed a battery of measures including the National Adult Reading Test, Gough Socialisation Scale and Sociomoral Reflection Measure-Short Form. There was no difference between the groups and levels of sociomoral reasoning, despite the ADHD group reporting greater antisocial personality traits. Sociomoral reasoning was positively correlated with intelligence. Results from a hierarchical multiple regressions indicated that both antisocial traits and IQ were significant predictors of sociomoral reasoning, with IQ proving the most powerful predictor. Whilst antisocial personality traits may explain some of the variance in levels of sociomoral reasoning, a diagnosis of ADHD does not appear to hinder the development of mature moral reasoning. Intellectual functioning appears to facilitate the development of sociomoral reasoning. A further analysis showed that both ADHD and low sociomoral reasoning were significant predictors of antisocial traits. The current findings have important treatment implications.",
author = "Thomason, {Kate Elizabeth} and Gisli Gudjonsson and Elaine German and Morris, {Robin Guy} and Young, {Susan Jane}",
year = "2014",
month = "8",
day = "7",
doi = "10.3934/publichealth.2014.3.147",
language = "English",
volume = "1",
pages = "147--159",
journal = "AIMS Public Health",
issn = "2327-8994",
number = "3",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Social moral reasoning in adults with ADHD: A pilot study

AU - Thomason, Kate Elizabeth

AU - Gudjonsson, Gisli

AU - German, Elaine

AU - Morris, Robin Guy

AU - Young, Susan Jane

PY - 2014/8/7

Y1 - 2014/8/7

N2 - Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is frequently linked with antisocial behaviour, yet less is known about its relationship with sociomoral reasoning, and the possible mediating effect of intelligence. A pilot study was designed to investigate the relationship between antisocial personality traits, intelligence and sociomoral reasoning in adults with ADHD. Twenty two adults with ADHD and 21 healthy controls, matched for age, gender and IQ completed a battery of measures including the National Adult Reading Test, Gough Socialisation Scale and Sociomoral Reflection Measure-Short Form. There was no difference between the groups and levels of sociomoral reasoning, despite the ADHD group reporting greater antisocial personality traits. Sociomoral reasoning was positively correlated with intelligence. Results from a hierarchical multiple regressions indicated that both antisocial traits and IQ were significant predictors of sociomoral reasoning, with IQ proving the most powerful predictor. Whilst antisocial personality traits may explain some of the variance in levels of sociomoral reasoning, a diagnosis of ADHD does not appear to hinder the development of mature moral reasoning. Intellectual functioning appears to facilitate the development of sociomoral reasoning. A further analysis showed that both ADHD and low sociomoral reasoning were significant predictors of antisocial traits. The current findings have important treatment implications.

AB - Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is frequently linked with antisocial behaviour, yet less is known about its relationship with sociomoral reasoning, and the possible mediating effect of intelligence. A pilot study was designed to investigate the relationship between antisocial personality traits, intelligence and sociomoral reasoning in adults with ADHD. Twenty two adults with ADHD and 21 healthy controls, matched for age, gender and IQ completed a battery of measures including the National Adult Reading Test, Gough Socialisation Scale and Sociomoral Reflection Measure-Short Form. There was no difference between the groups and levels of sociomoral reasoning, despite the ADHD group reporting greater antisocial personality traits. Sociomoral reasoning was positively correlated with intelligence. Results from a hierarchical multiple regressions indicated that both antisocial traits and IQ were significant predictors of sociomoral reasoning, with IQ proving the most powerful predictor. Whilst antisocial personality traits may explain some of the variance in levels of sociomoral reasoning, a diagnosis of ADHD does not appear to hinder the development of mature moral reasoning. Intellectual functioning appears to facilitate the development of sociomoral reasoning. A further analysis showed that both ADHD and low sociomoral reasoning were significant predictors of antisocial traits. The current findings have important treatment implications.

U2 - 10.3934/publichealth.2014.3.147

DO - 10.3934/publichealth.2014.3.147

M3 - Article

VL - 1

SP - 147

EP - 159

JO - AIMS Public Health

JF - AIMS Public Health

SN - 2327-8994

IS - 3

ER -

View graph of relations

© 2018 King's College London | Strand | London WC2R 2LS | England | United Kingdom | Tel +44 (0)20 7836 5454