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Socio-demographic characteristics and stereotyping of people who frequently attend accident and emergency departments for alcohol-related reasons: Qualitative study

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Socio-demographic characteristics and stereotyping of people who frequently attend accident and emergency departments for alcohol-related reasons: Qualitative study. / Neale, Joanne; Parkman, Tom; Day, Ed; Drummond, Colin.

In: Drugs: Education, Prevention and Policy, 24.06.2016, p. 1-8.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

Neale, J, Parkman, T, Day, E & Drummond, C 2016, 'Socio-demographic characteristics and stereotyping of people who frequently attend accident and emergency departments for alcohol-related reasons: Qualitative study', Drugs: Education, Prevention and Policy, pp. 1-8. https://doi.org/10.1080/09687637.2016.1185091

APA

Neale, J., Parkman, T., Day, E., & Drummond, C. (2016). Socio-demographic characteristics and stereotyping of people who frequently attend accident and emergency departments for alcohol-related reasons: Qualitative study. Drugs: Education, Prevention and Policy, 1-8. https://doi.org/10.1080/09687637.2016.1185091

Vancouver

Neale J, Parkman T, Day E, Drummond C. Socio-demographic characteristics and stereotyping of people who frequently attend accident and emergency departments for alcohol-related reasons: Qualitative study. Drugs: Education, Prevention and Policy. 2016 Jun 24;1-8. https://doi.org/10.1080/09687637.2016.1185091

Author

Neale, Joanne ; Parkman, Tom ; Day, Ed ; Drummond, Colin. / Socio-demographic characteristics and stereotyping of people who frequently attend accident and emergency departments for alcohol-related reasons: Qualitative study. In: Drugs: Education, Prevention and Policy. 2016 ; pp. 1-8.

Bibtex Download

@article{b85826c7f9b54d3eb7c99cb2bb29b923,
title = "Socio-demographic characteristics and stereotyping of people who frequently attend accident and emergency departments for alcohol-related reasons: Qualitative study",
abstract = "Aims: To provide new insights into the socio-demographic characteristics of people who frequently attend Accident and Emergency (A&E) departments for alcohol-related reasons and to explore the findings with reference to stereotyping and prejudice. Methods: Semi-structured qualitative interviews with 30 individuals (18 males; 12 females; aged 20–68 years) recruited from six A&E departments across London, United Kingdom. Participants had all attended A&E ≥10 times within the last year or ≥5 times in the last three months for an alcohol-related condition. Detailed data relating to participants’ socio-demographic characteristics were systematically coded and analysed. Findings: Participants reported many years of heavy drinking, and high levels of mental and physical ill health, unemployment, dependence on state benefits, housing problems and social isolation. Frequency of A&E attendances varied greatly by participant, patterns of drinking and other substance use were diverse, and the nature and extent of self-reported health and social problems were wide-ranging. Conclusions: Findings suggest that people who regularly attend A&E for alcohol-related reasons collectively experience multiple and complex needs, but individually have diverse patterns of drinking and other problems. Flexible person-centred systems could help to support this patient population, whilst avoidance of terminology that overstates group traits should help to minimise stigma.",
author = "Joanne Neale and Tom Parkman and Ed Day and Colin Drummond",
year = "2016",
month = "6",
day = "24",
doi = "10.1080/09687637.2016.1185091",
language = "English",
pages = "1--8",
journal = "Drugs: Education, Prevention and Policy",
issn = "0968-7637",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Socio-demographic characteristics and stereotyping of people who frequently attend accident and emergency departments for alcohol-related reasons: Qualitative study

AU - Neale, Joanne

AU - Parkman, Tom

AU - Day, Ed

AU - Drummond, Colin

PY - 2016/6/24

Y1 - 2016/6/24

N2 - Aims: To provide new insights into the socio-demographic characteristics of people who frequently attend Accident and Emergency (A&E) departments for alcohol-related reasons and to explore the findings with reference to stereotyping and prejudice. Methods: Semi-structured qualitative interviews with 30 individuals (18 males; 12 females; aged 20–68 years) recruited from six A&E departments across London, United Kingdom. Participants had all attended A&E ≥10 times within the last year or ≥5 times in the last three months for an alcohol-related condition. Detailed data relating to participants’ socio-demographic characteristics were systematically coded and analysed. Findings: Participants reported many years of heavy drinking, and high levels of mental and physical ill health, unemployment, dependence on state benefits, housing problems and social isolation. Frequency of A&E attendances varied greatly by participant, patterns of drinking and other substance use were diverse, and the nature and extent of self-reported health and social problems were wide-ranging. Conclusions: Findings suggest that people who regularly attend A&E for alcohol-related reasons collectively experience multiple and complex needs, but individually have diverse patterns of drinking and other problems. Flexible person-centred systems could help to support this patient population, whilst avoidance of terminology that overstates group traits should help to minimise stigma.

AB - Aims: To provide new insights into the socio-demographic characteristics of people who frequently attend Accident and Emergency (A&E) departments for alcohol-related reasons and to explore the findings with reference to stereotyping and prejudice. Methods: Semi-structured qualitative interviews with 30 individuals (18 males; 12 females; aged 20–68 years) recruited from six A&E departments across London, United Kingdom. Participants had all attended A&E ≥10 times within the last year or ≥5 times in the last three months for an alcohol-related condition. Detailed data relating to participants’ socio-demographic characteristics were systematically coded and analysed. Findings: Participants reported many years of heavy drinking, and high levels of mental and physical ill health, unemployment, dependence on state benefits, housing problems and social isolation. Frequency of A&E attendances varied greatly by participant, patterns of drinking and other substance use were diverse, and the nature and extent of self-reported health and social problems were wide-ranging. Conclusions: Findings suggest that people who regularly attend A&E for alcohol-related reasons collectively experience multiple and complex needs, but individually have diverse patterns of drinking and other problems. Flexible person-centred systems could help to support this patient population, whilst avoidance of terminology that overstates group traits should help to minimise stigma.

U2 - 10.1080/09687637.2016.1185091

DO - 10.1080/09687637.2016.1185091

M3 - Article

SP - 1

EP - 8

JO - Drugs: Education, Prevention and Policy

JF - Drugs: Education, Prevention and Policy

SN - 0968-7637

ER -

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