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State Transformation and Populism: From the Internationalized to the Neo-Sovereign State?

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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State Transformation and Populism : From the Internationalized to the Neo-Sovereign State? / Chryssogelos, Angelos.

In: POLITICS, 24.07.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

Chryssogelos, A 2018, 'State Transformation and Populism: From the Internationalized to the Neo-Sovereign State?', POLITICS.

APA

Chryssogelos, A. (Accepted/In press). State Transformation and Populism: From the Internationalized to the Neo-Sovereign State? POLITICS.

Vancouver

Chryssogelos A. State Transformation and Populism: From the Internationalized to the Neo-Sovereign State? POLITICS. 2018 Jul 24.

Author

Chryssogelos, Angelos. / State Transformation and Populism : From the Internationalized to the Neo-Sovereign State?. In: POLITICS. 2018.

Bibtex Download

@article{e86660f0df5348cf9051f6400ab76c7a,
title = "State Transformation and Populism: From the Internationalized to the Neo-Sovereign State?",
abstract = "This article conceptualizes populism as a discourse of international relations that arises as response to state transformation, a phenomenon that encompasses changes in both state-society relations and the norms defining the appropriate practice of statehood. The current surge of populism is a response to one such transformation: the internationalization of state elites and their insulation from popular scrutiny. Populism does not simply address material and cultural dislocations that internationalization entails. Crucially, its distinct discursive logic allows these partial social demands to adopt the moral claim to representation of the ‘real people’ and so counter the universality of the norms that underpin state transformation. Beyond the current conjuncture of state internationalization, this conceptualization accommodates iterations of populism in various regional and historical contexts of state transformation, making it a promising basis for the further comparative study of populism.",
keywords = "populism, state transformation, discourse, nationalism, globalization",
author = "Angelos Chryssogelos",
year = "2018",
month = "7",
day = "24",
language = "English",
journal = "POLITICS",
issn = "0263-3957",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - State Transformation and Populism

T2 - From the Internationalized to the Neo-Sovereign State?

AU - Chryssogelos, Angelos

PY - 2018/7/24

Y1 - 2018/7/24

N2 - This article conceptualizes populism as a discourse of international relations that arises as response to state transformation, a phenomenon that encompasses changes in both state-society relations and the norms defining the appropriate practice of statehood. The current surge of populism is a response to one such transformation: the internationalization of state elites and their insulation from popular scrutiny. Populism does not simply address material and cultural dislocations that internationalization entails. Crucially, its distinct discursive logic allows these partial social demands to adopt the moral claim to representation of the ‘real people’ and so counter the universality of the norms that underpin state transformation. Beyond the current conjuncture of state internationalization, this conceptualization accommodates iterations of populism in various regional and historical contexts of state transformation, making it a promising basis for the further comparative study of populism.

AB - This article conceptualizes populism as a discourse of international relations that arises as response to state transformation, a phenomenon that encompasses changes in both state-society relations and the norms defining the appropriate practice of statehood. The current surge of populism is a response to one such transformation: the internationalization of state elites and their insulation from popular scrutiny. Populism does not simply address material and cultural dislocations that internationalization entails. Crucially, its distinct discursive logic allows these partial social demands to adopt the moral claim to representation of the ‘real people’ and so counter the universality of the norms that underpin state transformation. Beyond the current conjuncture of state internationalization, this conceptualization accommodates iterations of populism in various regional and historical contexts of state transformation, making it a promising basis for the further comparative study of populism.

KW - populism

KW - state transformation

KW - discourse

KW - nationalism

KW - globalization

M3 - Article

JO - POLITICS

JF - POLITICS

SN - 0263-3957

ER -

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