Statins: panacea for sepsis?

M Terblanche*, Y Almog, RS Rosenson, TS Smith, DG Hackam

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalEditorialpeer-review

103 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Sepsis occurs when the immune system responds to a localised infection at a systemic level, thereby causing tissue damage and organ dysfunction. Statins have proven health benefits in many diseases involving vascular inflammation and injury. Recent animal data suggest that the administration of a statin before a sepsis-inducing insult reduces morbidity and improves survival. The immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory effects of statins, collectively referred to as pleiotropic effects, lend biological plausibility to such findings. Limited human data hint at reduced mortality rates in bacteraemic patients, and a reduced risk of sepsis in patients with bacterial infections concurrently taking statins. These lines of evidence point to a potential new treatment and prevention modality for sepsis. The stage is set for randomised controlled clinical trials that will determine whether statins represent a safe and beneficial treatment in critically ill, septic patients and whether statins are effective at preventing sepsis in high-risk clinical settings.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)242-248
Number of pages7
JournalLancet Infectious Diseases
Volume6
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2006

Keywords

  • C-REACTIVE PROTEIN
  • COA-REDUCTASE INHIBITOR
  • CORONARY-HEART-DISEASE
  • NITRIC-OXIDE SYNTHASE
  • HUMAN ENDOTHELIAL-CELLS
  • VASCULAR SMOOTH-MUSCLE
  • COENZYME-A REDUCTASE
  • PLACEBO-CONTROLLED TRIAL
  • LOW-DENSITY LIPOPROTEINS
  • MULTIPLE ORGAN FAILURE

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