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Still unknown and overlooked? Anthropologies of childhood and infancy in Southern Africa, 1995-2020

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Still unknown and overlooked? Anthropologies of childhood and infancy in Southern Africa, 1995-2020. / Ross, Fiona; Pentecost, Michelle.

In: ETHNOS, 01.11.2021.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Harvard

Ross, F & Pentecost, M 2021, 'Still unknown and overlooked? Anthropologies of childhood and infancy in Southern Africa, 1995-2020', ETHNOS. https://doi.org/10.1080/00141844.2021.1994622

APA

Ross, F., & Pentecost, M. (2021). Still unknown and overlooked? Anthropologies of childhood and infancy in Southern Africa, 1995-2020. ETHNOS. https://doi.org/10.1080/00141844.2021.1994622

Vancouver

Ross F, Pentecost M. Still unknown and overlooked? Anthropologies of childhood and infancy in Southern Africa, 1995-2020. ETHNOS. 2021 Nov 1. https://doi.org/10.1080/00141844.2021.1994622

Author

Ross, Fiona ; Pentecost, Michelle. / Still unknown and overlooked? Anthropologies of childhood and infancy in Southern Africa, 1995-2020. In: ETHNOS. 2021.

Bibtex Download

@article{8d0e0b51db8d459db9e065a3b6c97fb4,
title = "Still unknown and overlooked? Anthropologies of childhood and infancy in Southern Africa, 1995-2020",
abstract = "In 1995, Pamela Reynolds published a stringent critique of the lack of attention to children in southern African Anthropology. {\textquoteleft}Not known because not looked for{\textquoteright} made a powerful case for careful and close attention to children{\textquoteright}s worlds. Her diagnosis was terse; anthropology had not made sufficient theoretical inroads to understanding children and childhoods despite a research method that seemed custom-made for the task. Twenty-five years later, the picture has changed considerably, but there are still significant gaps, particularly in relation to babies and infancy. In this article, we offer an overview of developments in anthropological work and then suggest approaches for work with infants. The objective of such work is not simply to fill in missing gaps in knowledge, but to raise epistemological and methodological questions about how we come to know.",
author = "Fiona Ross and Michelle Pentecost",
year = "2021",
month = nov,
day = "1",
doi = "10.1080/00141844.2021.1994622",
language = "English",
journal = "ETHNOS",
issn = "0014-1844",
publisher = "Routledge",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Still unknown and overlooked? Anthropologies of childhood and infancy in Southern Africa, 1995-2020

AU - Ross, Fiona

AU - Pentecost, Michelle

PY - 2021/11/1

Y1 - 2021/11/1

N2 - In 1995, Pamela Reynolds published a stringent critique of the lack of attention to children in southern African Anthropology. ‘Not known because not looked for’ made a powerful case for careful and close attention to children’s worlds. Her diagnosis was terse; anthropology had not made sufficient theoretical inroads to understanding children and childhoods despite a research method that seemed custom-made for the task. Twenty-five years later, the picture has changed considerably, but there are still significant gaps, particularly in relation to babies and infancy. In this article, we offer an overview of developments in anthropological work and then suggest approaches for work with infants. The objective of such work is not simply to fill in missing gaps in knowledge, but to raise epistemological and methodological questions about how we come to know.

AB - In 1995, Pamela Reynolds published a stringent critique of the lack of attention to children in southern African Anthropology. ‘Not known because not looked for’ made a powerful case for careful and close attention to children’s worlds. Her diagnosis was terse; anthropology had not made sufficient theoretical inroads to understanding children and childhoods despite a research method that seemed custom-made for the task. Twenty-five years later, the picture has changed considerably, but there are still significant gaps, particularly in relation to babies and infancy. In this article, we offer an overview of developments in anthropological work and then suggest approaches for work with infants. The objective of such work is not simply to fill in missing gaps in knowledge, but to raise epistemological and methodological questions about how we come to know.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85118464504&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1080/00141844.2021.1994622

DO - 10.1080/00141844.2021.1994622

M3 - Article

JO - ETHNOS

JF - ETHNOS

SN - 0014-1844

ER -

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