Subjective cognitive complaints across the adult life span: a 14-year analysis of trends and associations using the 1993, 2000 and 2007 English Psychiatric Morbidity Surveys

A. Begum*, M. Dewey, A. Hassiotis, M. Prince, S. Wessely, R. Stewart

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

37 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Cognitive complaints are common in all age groups but most often researched in old age. We aimed to investigate prevalences and time trends over 14 years of subjective memory complaints (SMC) and subjective concentration complaints (SCC) in adults and investigate associations with mood disorders and cognitive function.

Method: Data from three English national mental health surveys carried out in 1993, 2000 and 2007 were analysed. SMC and SCC were measured using the Clinical Interview Schedule-Revised and cognitive function using the modified Telephone Interview for Cognitive Status.

Results: Both SMC and SCC increased up to middle age and then declined, followed by a second rise in the very oldest age groups. Age-specific prevalence of both increased across survey years but relationships with mental health and cognitive outcomes were relatively stable.

Conclusions: Cognitive complaints are most common in middle age and have become more prevalent over time.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1977-1987
Number of pages11
JournalPsychological Medicine
Volume44
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2014

Keywords

  • Concentration
  • national surveys
  • subjective memory complaints trends
  • COMMON MENTAL-DISORDER
  • MEMORY COMPLAINTS
  • OLDER-ADULTS
  • HEALTH
  • PREVALENCE
  • POPULATION
  • IMPAIRMENT
  • COMMUNITY
  • SYMPTOMS
  • DEFICITS

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