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Supernova triggers for end:Devonian extinctions

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Supernova triggers for end:Devonian extinctions. / Fields, Brian D.; Melott, Adrian L.; Ellis, John; Ertel, Adrienne F.; Fry, Brian J.; Lieberman, Bruce S.; Liu, Zhenghai; Miller, Jesse A.; Thomas, Brian C.

In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, Vol. 117, No. 35, 01.09.2020, p. 21008-21010.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

Fields, BD, Melott, AL, Ellis, J, Ertel, AF, Fry, BJ, Lieberman, BS, Liu, Z, Miller, JA & Thomas, BC 2020, 'Supernova triggers for end:Devonian extinctions', Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, vol. 117, no. 35, pp. 21008-21010. https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.2013774117

APA

Fields, B. D., Melott, A. L., Ellis, J., Ertel, A. F., Fry, B. J., Lieberman, B. S., Liu, Z., Miller, J. A., & Thomas, B. C. (2020). Supernova triggers for end:Devonian extinctions. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 117(35), 21008-21010. https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.2013774117

Vancouver

Fields BD, Melott AL, Ellis J, Ertel AF, Fry BJ, Lieberman BS et al. Supernova triggers for end:Devonian extinctions. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. 2020 Sep 1;117(35):21008-21010. https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.2013774117

Author

Fields, Brian D. ; Melott, Adrian L. ; Ellis, John ; Ertel, Adrienne F. ; Fry, Brian J. ; Lieberman, Bruce S. ; Liu, Zhenghai ; Miller, Jesse A. ; Thomas, Brian C. / Supernova triggers for end:Devonian extinctions. In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. 2020 ; Vol. 117, No. 35. pp. 21008-21010.

Bibtex Download

@article{0a5faccb5ce24e1c8df46fd844cc5a2e,
title = "Supernova triggers for end:Devonian extinctions",
abstract = "The Late Devonian was a protracted period of low speciation resulting in biodiversity decline, culminating in extinction events near the Devonian–Carboniferous boundary. Recent evidence indicates that the final extinction event may have coincided with a dramatic drop in stratospheric ozone, possibly due to a global temperature rise. Here we study an alternative possible cause for the postulated ozone drop: a nearby supernova explosion that could inflict damage by accelerating cosmic rays that can deliver ionizing radiation for up to ∼ 100 ky. We therefore propose that the end-Devonian extinctions were triggered by supernova explosions at ∼ 20 pc, somewhat beyond the “kill distance” that would have precipitated a full mass extinction. Such nearby supernovae are likely due to core collapses of massive stars; these are concentrated in the thin Galactic disk where the Sun resides. Detecting either of the long-lived radioisotopes 146Sm or 244Pu in one or more end-Devonian extinction strata would confirm a supernova origin, point to the core-collapse explosion of a massive star, and probe supernova nucleosynthesis. Other possible tests of the supernova hypothesis are discussed.",
keywords = "Extinction | Supernova | Cosmic rays | Ozone | Isotope geology",
author = "Fields, {Brian D.} and Melott, {Adrian L.} and John Ellis and Ertel, {Adrienne F.} and Fry, {Brian J.} and Lieberman, {Bruce S.} and Zhenghai Liu and Miller, {Jesse A.} and Thomas, {Brian C.}",
year = "2020",
month = sep,
day = "1",
doi = "10.1073/pnas.2013774117",
language = "English",
volume = "117",
pages = "21008--21010",
journal = "Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America",
issn = "0027-8424",
publisher = "National Acad Sciences",
number = "35",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Supernova triggers for end:Devonian extinctions

AU - Fields, Brian D.

AU - Melott, Adrian L.

AU - Ellis, John

AU - Ertel, Adrienne F.

AU - Fry, Brian J.

AU - Lieberman, Bruce S.

AU - Liu, Zhenghai

AU - Miller, Jesse A.

AU - Thomas, Brian C.

PY - 2020/9/1

Y1 - 2020/9/1

N2 - The Late Devonian was a protracted period of low speciation resulting in biodiversity decline, culminating in extinction events near the Devonian–Carboniferous boundary. Recent evidence indicates that the final extinction event may have coincided with a dramatic drop in stratospheric ozone, possibly due to a global temperature rise. Here we study an alternative possible cause for the postulated ozone drop: a nearby supernova explosion that could inflict damage by accelerating cosmic rays that can deliver ionizing radiation for up to ∼ 100 ky. We therefore propose that the end-Devonian extinctions were triggered by supernova explosions at ∼ 20 pc, somewhat beyond the “kill distance” that would have precipitated a full mass extinction. Such nearby supernovae are likely due to core collapses of massive stars; these are concentrated in the thin Galactic disk where the Sun resides. Detecting either of the long-lived radioisotopes 146Sm or 244Pu in one or more end-Devonian extinction strata would confirm a supernova origin, point to the core-collapse explosion of a massive star, and probe supernova nucleosynthesis. Other possible tests of the supernova hypothesis are discussed.

AB - The Late Devonian was a protracted period of low speciation resulting in biodiversity decline, culminating in extinction events near the Devonian–Carboniferous boundary. Recent evidence indicates that the final extinction event may have coincided with a dramatic drop in stratospheric ozone, possibly due to a global temperature rise. Here we study an alternative possible cause for the postulated ozone drop: a nearby supernova explosion that could inflict damage by accelerating cosmic rays that can deliver ionizing radiation for up to ∼ 100 ky. We therefore propose that the end-Devonian extinctions were triggered by supernova explosions at ∼ 20 pc, somewhat beyond the “kill distance” that would have precipitated a full mass extinction. Such nearby supernovae are likely due to core collapses of massive stars; these are concentrated in the thin Galactic disk where the Sun resides. Detecting either of the long-lived radioisotopes 146Sm or 244Pu in one or more end-Devonian extinction strata would confirm a supernova origin, point to the core-collapse explosion of a massive star, and probe supernova nucleosynthesis. Other possible tests of the supernova hypothesis are discussed.

KW - Extinction | Supernova | Cosmic rays | Ozone | Isotope geology

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85090507887&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1073/pnas.2013774117

DO - 10.1073/pnas.2013774117

M3 - Article

C2 - 32817482

AN - SCOPUS:85090507887

VL - 117

SP - 21008

EP - 21010

JO - Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America

JF - Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America

SN - 0027-8424

IS - 35

ER -

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