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Synaesthetic Traces: Digital Acquisition of Musical Shapes

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingPoster abstract

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Synaesthetic Traces: Digital Acquisition of Musical Shapes. / Kussner, Mats; Gold, Nicolas; Tidhar, Dan; Prior, Helen; Leech-Wilkinson, Daniel.

Proceedings of the 2nd Supporting Digital Humanities Conference: ‘Answering the unaskable’. University of Copenhagen, 2011.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingPoster abstract

Harvard

Kussner, M, Gold, N, Tidhar, D, Prior, H & Leech-Wilkinson, D 2011, Synaesthetic Traces: Digital Acquisition of Musical Shapes. in Proceedings of the 2nd Supporting Digital Humanities Conference: ‘Answering the unaskable’. University of Copenhagen.

APA

Kussner, M., Gold, N., Tidhar, D., Prior, H., & Leech-Wilkinson, D. (2011). Synaesthetic Traces: Digital Acquisition of Musical Shapes. In Proceedings of the 2nd Supporting Digital Humanities Conference: ‘Answering the unaskable’ University of Copenhagen.

Vancouver

Kussner M, Gold N, Tidhar D, Prior H, Leech-Wilkinson D. Synaesthetic Traces: Digital Acquisition of Musical Shapes. In Proceedings of the 2nd Supporting Digital Humanities Conference: ‘Answering the unaskable’. University of Copenhagen. 2011

Author

Kussner, Mats ; Gold, Nicolas ; Tidhar, Dan ; Prior, Helen ; Leech-Wilkinson, Daniel. / Synaesthetic Traces: Digital Acquisition of Musical Shapes. Proceedings of the 2nd Supporting Digital Humanities Conference: ‘Answering the unaskable’. University of Copenhagen, 2011.

Bibtex Download

@inbook{304c0f6c72d243a28322461605aa10f8,
title = "Synaesthetic Traces: Digital Acquisition of Musical Shapes",
abstract = "In this paper we describe two projects aiming to shed light on the notion of shape, a concept widely used by musicians to refer to various musical characteristics but one that has so far been almost entirely neglected by the research community. Project 1 is a study examining how musicians and non-musicians represent sound visually, making use of an electronic graphics tablet and tailored capturing software to gain insight into visualised musical shapes and the processes that produce that visualization. Project 2 aims to measure people{\textquoteright}s shaped responses to music as expressed through hand, arm and whole body movements using Microsoft{\textquoteright}s{\textregistered} Kinect technology and a Wii remote controller. The digitally acquired data and methodologically advanced analyses from both projects have already influenced and will continue to inform other, humanities- and social science-driven projects, to the same extent as the latter have enhanced the progress of the former. We are convinced that the overarching investigation of {\textquoteleft}Shaping music in performance{\textquoteright} can only benefit from such a collaboration.",
author = "Mats Kussner and Nicolas Gold and Dan Tidhar and Helen Prior and Daniel Leech-Wilkinson",
year = "2011",
language = "English",
booktitle = "Proceedings of the 2nd Supporting Digital Humanities Conference",
publisher = "University of Copenhagen",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) Download

TY - CHAP

T1 - Synaesthetic Traces: Digital Acquisition of Musical Shapes

AU - Kussner, Mats

AU - Gold, Nicolas

AU - Tidhar, Dan

AU - Prior, Helen

AU - Leech-Wilkinson, Daniel

PY - 2011

Y1 - 2011

N2 - In this paper we describe two projects aiming to shed light on the notion of shape, a concept widely used by musicians to refer to various musical characteristics but one that has so far been almost entirely neglected by the research community. Project 1 is a study examining how musicians and non-musicians represent sound visually, making use of an electronic graphics tablet and tailored capturing software to gain insight into visualised musical shapes and the processes that produce that visualization. Project 2 aims to measure people’s shaped responses to music as expressed through hand, arm and whole body movements using Microsoft’s® Kinect technology and a Wii remote controller. The digitally acquired data and methodologically advanced analyses from both projects have already influenced and will continue to inform other, humanities- and social science-driven projects, to the same extent as the latter have enhanced the progress of the former. We are convinced that the overarching investigation of ‘Shaping music in performance’ can only benefit from such a collaboration.

AB - In this paper we describe two projects aiming to shed light on the notion of shape, a concept widely used by musicians to refer to various musical characteristics but one that has so far been almost entirely neglected by the research community. Project 1 is a study examining how musicians and non-musicians represent sound visually, making use of an electronic graphics tablet and tailored capturing software to gain insight into visualised musical shapes and the processes that produce that visualization. Project 2 aims to measure people’s shaped responses to music as expressed through hand, arm and whole body movements using Microsoft’s® Kinect technology and a Wii remote controller. The digitally acquired data and methodologically advanced analyses from both projects have already influenced and will continue to inform other, humanities- and social science-driven projects, to the same extent as the latter have enhanced the progress of the former. We are convinced that the overarching investigation of ‘Shaping music in performance’ can only benefit from such a collaboration.

UR - http://www.certh.gr/dat/98F5B8ED/file.pdf

M3 - Poster abstract

BT - Proceedings of the 2nd Supporting Digital Humanities Conference

PB - University of Copenhagen

ER -

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