Synthetic delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol elicits schizophrenia-like negative symptoms which are distinct from sedation

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Abstract

Objective It is unknown if cannabis recreates the negative symptoms of schizophrenia. Methods Healthy male volunteers (n = 22) completed two experimental sessions in which they received intravenous (IV) delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) 2.5 mg or placebo in a randomised counterbalanced order. Negative symptoms were rated using the self-reported community assessment of psychic experiences scale (CAPE). Sedation was rated using the mood-adjective check-list (UMACL). Plasma concentrations of THC were measured over the course of the study. Data were analysed by non-parametric tests. Results Participants reported an increase in negative symptoms from baseline under THC but not placebo conditions (p <0.001). Negative symptoms showed no relationship with self-rated sedation or plasma concentrations of THC. Conclusions At plasma concentrations resembling recreational use, THC elicited schizophrenia-like negative symptoms which were not merely attributable to sedation. In the community, negative symptoms may be an adverse effect of cannabis use. Copyright (C) 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)77-80
Number of pages4
JournalHuman Psychopharmacology : Clinical and Experimental
Volume26
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2011

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