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Targeting image-based autobiographical memory in childhood to prevent emotional disorders: Intervention development and a feasibility randomised controlled trial

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Original languageEnglish
Article number103913
JournalBehaviour Research and Therapy
Volume144
DOIs
PublishedSep 2021

Bibliographical note

Funding Information: This project was supported by an Arts and Well-being grant from the Cultural Institute at King's College London and by funding from the British Academy and Leverhulme Small Research Grant scheme ( SRG\171102 ). In addition, this study represents independent research from a Clinical Doctoral Research Fellowship (Dr Victoria Pile, ICA-CDRF-2015-01-007) supported by the National Institute for Health Research and Health Education England. The views expressed in this publication are those of the authors and not necessarily those of the NHS, NIHR, Health Education England or the Department of Health. Funding Information: This project was supported by an Arts and Well-being grant from the Cultural Institute at King's College London and by funding from the British Academy and Leverhulme Small Research Grant scheme (SRG\171102). In addition, this study represents independent research from a Clinical Doctoral Research Fellowship (Dr Victoria Pile, ICA-CDRF-2015-01-007) supported by the National Institute for Health Research and Health Education England. The views expressed in this publication are those of the authors and not necessarily those of the NHS, NIHR, Health Education England or the Department of Health. Publisher Copyright: © 2021 Copyright: Copyright 2021 Elsevier B.V., All rights reserved.

King's Authors

Abstract

Maladaptive cognitive styles confer vulnerability for emotional disorders and may emerge in childhood. In three phases, we developed and evaluated a novel parent-led intervention (My Memory Forest) to target overgeneral memory and avoidance of negative memories. In phase 1, the intervention was co-designed using two focus groups (n = 30 children) and consultation with teachers and parents. The acceptability, feasibility, and clinical potential of My Memory Forest was initially evaluated in phase two (n = 12 children aged 6 to 9) and then in a feasibility randomised controlled trial in phase three, against an active control (n = 56 aged 6 to 9). Acceptability and engagement were good, and no harm was reported by parents or participants. Phase 2 identified decreases in self-reported anxiety (d = 1.08), depression (d = 0.51) and vividness of negative events (d = 0.53). There was little change in parent-reported symptoms. In phase 3, recruitment was highly feasible and participant retention excellent (100%) but parent retention poor (55%). Descriptive statistics indicated similar changes in anxiety and depression for both groups. Changes between Phases 2 and 3 (e.g. methods of recruitment) could explain the discrepancy between results. Further development is necessary before proceeding to another trial. Trial registration: ISRCTN13142918.

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