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Technical boys and creative girls: the career aspirations of digitally-skilled youths

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Technical boys and creative girls: the career aspirations of digitally-skilled youths. / Wong, Billy; Kemp, Peter.

In: Cambridge Journal of Education, Vol. 48, 3, 2018, p. 301.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

Wong, B & Kemp, P 2018, 'Technical boys and creative girls: the career aspirations of digitally-skilled youths', Cambridge Journal of Education, vol. 48, 3, pp. 301. https://doi.org/10.1080/0305764X.2017.1325443

APA

Wong, B., & Kemp, P. (2018). Technical boys and creative girls: the career aspirations of digitally-skilled youths. Cambridge Journal of Education, 48, 301. [3]. https://doi.org/10.1080/0305764X.2017.1325443

Vancouver

Wong B, Kemp P. Technical boys and creative girls: the career aspirations of digitally-skilled youths. Cambridge Journal of Education. 2018;48:301. 3. https://doi.org/10.1080/0305764X.2017.1325443

Author

Wong, Billy ; Kemp, Peter. / Technical boys and creative girls: the career aspirations of digitally-skilled youths. In: Cambridge Journal of Education. 2018 ; Vol. 48. pp. 301.

Bibtex Download

@article{ddb5fe7b755a416683030d4ee2e0e4e0,
title = "Technical boys and creative girls: the career aspirations of digitally-skilled youths",
abstract = "Digital technology is increasingly central to our lives, particularly among young people. However, there remains a concern from government and businesses of a digital skills gap because many youths, especially girls, tend to be consumers rather than creators of technology. Drawing on 32 semi-structured interviews with digitally-skilled teenagers (aged 13-19), we investigate their digital career aspirations and examine how identities and discourses of gender can interact with the type of digital careers that are of interest to these youths. While we found digitally-skilled young people still articulate traditional gendered discourses of digital competence, especially around technical abilities, we highlight the growing importance of creativity as a career pathway into digital technology. Implications of the findings are discussed in relation to the new computing curriculum in England, which prioritises technical computing skills, and the discontinuation of Information and Communications Technology (ICT), which facilitates a broader usage of software and digital productivity.",
author = "Billy Wong and Peter Kemp",
year = "2018",
doi = "10.1080/0305764X.2017.1325443",
language = "English",
volume = "48",
pages = "301",
journal = "Cambridge Journal of Education",
issn = "0305-764X",
publisher = "Routledge",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Technical boys and creative girls: the career aspirations of digitally-skilled youths

AU - Wong, Billy

AU - Kemp, Peter

PY - 2018

Y1 - 2018

N2 - Digital technology is increasingly central to our lives, particularly among young people. However, there remains a concern from government and businesses of a digital skills gap because many youths, especially girls, tend to be consumers rather than creators of technology. Drawing on 32 semi-structured interviews with digitally-skilled teenagers (aged 13-19), we investigate their digital career aspirations and examine how identities and discourses of gender can interact with the type of digital careers that are of interest to these youths. While we found digitally-skilled young people still articulate traditional gendered discourses of digital competence, especially around technical abilities, we highlight the growing importance of creativity as a career pathway into digital technology. Implications of the findings are discussed in relation to the new computing curriculum in England, which prioritises technical computing skills, and the discontinuation of Information and Communications Technology (ICT), which facilitates a broader usage of software and digital productivity.

AB - Digital technology is increasingly central to our lives, particularly among young people. However, there remains a concern from government and businesses of a digital skills gap because many youths, especially girls, tend to be consumers rather than creators of technology. Drawing on 32 semi-structured interviews with digitally-skilled teenagers (aged 13-19), we investigate their digital career aspirations and examine how identities and discourses of gender can interact with the type of digital careers that are of interest to these youths. While we found digitally-skilled young people still articulate traditional gendered discourses of digital competence, especially around technical abilities, we highlight the growing importance of creativity as a career pathway into digital technology. Implications of the findings are discussed in relation to the new computing curriculum in England, which prioritises technical computing skills, and the discontinuation of Information and Communications Technology (ICT), which facilitates a broader usage of software and digital productivity.

U2 - 10.1080/0305764X.2017.1325443

DO - 10.1080/0305764X.2017.1325443

M3 - Article

VL - 48

SP - 301

JO - Cambridge Journal of Education

JF - Cambridge Journal of Education

SN - 0305-764X

M1 - 3

ER -

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