The assessment and rehabilitation of prospective memory problems in people with neurological disorders: a review

Jessica Fish, Barbara A Wilson, Tom Manly

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

92 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

People with neurological disorders often report difficulty with prospective memory (PM), that is, remembering to do things they had intended to do. This paper briefly reviews the literature regarding the neuropsychology of PM function, concluding that from the clinical perspective, PM is best considered in terms of its separable but interacting mnemonic and executive components. Next, the strengths and limitations in the current clinical assessment of PM, including the assessment of component processes, desktop analogues of PM tasks, and naturalistic PM tasks, are outlined. The evidence base for the rehabilitation of PM is then considered, focusing on retraining PM, using retrospective memory strategies, problem-solving training, and finally, electronic memory aids. It is proposed that further research should focus on establishing the predictive validity of PM assessment, and refining promising rehabilitation techniques.
Original languageEnglish
Article numberN/A
Pages (from-to)161-179
Number of pages19
JournalNeuropsychological Rehabilitation
Volume20
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2010

Keywords

  • Humans
  • Memory Disorders
  • Models, Psychological
  • Nervous System Diseases
  • Neuropsychological Tests

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