King's College London

Research portal

The association between cardiorespiratory fitness and the incidence of common mental health disorders: A systematic review and meta-analysis

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Standard

The association between cardiorespiratory fitness and the incidence of common mental health disorders : A systematic review and meta-analysis. / Kandola, A.; Ashdown-Franks, G.; Stubbs, B.; Osborn, D. P.J.; Hayes, J. F.

In: Journal of Affective Disorders, Vol. 257, 01.10.2019, p. 748-757.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Harvard

Kandola, A, Ashdown-Franks, G, Stubbs, B, Osborn, DPJ & Hayes, JF 2019, 'The association between cardiorespiratory fitness and the incidence of common mental health disorders: A systematic review and meta-analysis', Journal of Affective Disorders, vol. 257, pp. 748-757. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jad.2019.07.088

APA

Kandola, A., Ashdown-Franks, G., Stubbs, B., Osborn, D. P. J., & Hayes, J. F. (2019). The association between cardiorespiratory fitness and the incidence of common mental health disorders: A systematic review and meta-analysis. Journal of Affective Disorders, 257, 748-757. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jad.2019.07.088

Vancouver

Kandola A, Ashdown-Franks G, Stubbs B, Osborn DPJ, Hayes JF. The association between cardiorespiratory fitness and the incidence of common mental health disorders: A systematic review and meta-analysis. Journal of Affective Disorders. 2019 Oct 1;257:748-757. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jad.2019.07.088

Author

Kandola, A. ; Ashdown-Franks, G. ; Stubbs, B. ; Osborn, D. P.J. ; Hayes, J. F. / The association between cardiorespiratory fitness and the incidence of common mental health disorders : A systematic review and meta-analysis. In: Journal of Affective Disorders. 2019 ; Vol. 257. pp. 748-757.

Bibtex Download

@article{aa3ce743f6834ae088ba0fcaf561e8bb,
title = "The association between cardiorespiratory fitness and the incidence of common mental health disorders: A systematic review and meta-analysis",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: Physical activity is associated with a lower incidence of common mental health disorder, but less is known about the impact of cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF). METHODS: In this review, we systematically evaluated the relationship between CRF and the incidence of common mental health disorders in prospective cohort studies. We systematically searched six major electronic databases from inception to 23rd of May 2019. We assessed study quality using the Newcastle-Ottawa scale. RESULTS: We were able to pool the hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of four studies including at least 27,733,154 person-years of data. We found that low CRF (HR = 1.47, [95% CI 1.23 - 1.76] p < 0.001 I2 = 85.1) and medium CRF (HR = 1.23, [95% CI 1.09 - 1.38] p < 0.001 I2 = 87.20) CRF are associated with a 47% and 23% greater risk of a common mental health disorders respectively, compared with high CRF. We found evidence to suggest a dose-response relationship between CRF and the risk of common mental health disorders. LIMITATIONS: We were only able to identify a small number of eligible studies from our search and heterogeneity was substantial in the subsequent meta-analysis. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings indicate that there is a longitudinal association between CRF levels and the risk of a common mental health disorder. CRF levels could be useful for identifying and preventing common mental health disorders at a population-level.",
keywords = "Anxiety, Depression, Exercise, Physical activity, Prevention, Risk factor",
author = "A. Kandola and G. Ashdown-Franks and B. Stubbs and Osborn, {D. P.J.} and Hayes, {J. F.}",
year = "2019",
month = oct,
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.jad.2019.07.088",
language = "English",
volume = "257",
pages = "748--757",
journal = "Journal of Affective Disorders",
issn = "0165-0327",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - The association between cardiorespiratory fitness and the incidence of common mental health disorders

T2 - A systematic review and meta-analysis

AU - Kandola, A.

AU - Ashdown-Franks, G.

AU - Stubbs, B.

AU - Osborn, D. P.J.

AU - Hayes, J. F.

PY - 2019/10/1

Y1 - 2019/10/1

N2 - BACKGROUND: Physical activity is associated with a lower incidence of common mental health disorder, but less is known about the impact of cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF). METHODS: In this review, we systematically evaluated the relationship between CRF and the incidence of common mental health disorders in prospective cohort studies. We systematically searched six major electronic databases from inception to 23rd of May 2019. We assessed study quality using the Newcastle-Ottawa scale. RESULTS: We were able to pool the hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of four studies including at least 27,733,154 person-years of data. We found that low CRF (HR = 1.47, [95% CI 1.23 - 1.76] p < 0.001 I2 = 85.1) and medium CRF (HR = 1.23, [95% CI 1.09 - 1.38] p < 0.001 I2 = 87.20) CRF are associated with a 47% and 23% greater risk of a common mental health disorders respectively, compared with high CRF. We found evidence to suggest a dose-response relationship between CRF and the risk of common mental health disorders. LIMITATIONS: We were only able to identify a small number of eligible studies from our search and heterogeneity was substantial in the subsequent meta-analysis. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings indicate that there is a longitudinal association between CRF levels and the risk of a common mental health disorder. CRF levels could be useful for identifying and preventing common mental health disorders at a population-level.

AB - BACKGROUND: Physical activity is associated with a lower incidence of common mental health disorder, but less is known about the impact of cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF). METHODS: In this review, we systematically evaluated the relationship between CRF and the incidence of common mental health disorders in prospective cohort studies. We systematically searched six major electronic databases from inception to 23rd of May 2019. We assessed study quality using the Newcastle-Ottawa scale. RESULTS: We were able to pool the hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of four studies including at least 27,733,154 person-years of data. We found that low CRF (HR = 1.47, [95% CI 1.23 - 1.76] p < 0.001 I2 = 85.1) and medium CRF (HR = 1.23, [95% CI 1.09 - 1.38] p < 0.001 I2 = 87.20) CRF are associated with a 47% and 23% greater risk of a common mental health disorders respectively, compared with high CRF. We found evidence to suggest a dose-response relationship between CRF and the risk of common mental health disorders. LIMITATIONS: We were only able to identify a small number of eligible studies from our search and heterogeneity was substantial in the subsequent meta-analysis. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings indicate that there is a longitudinal association between CRF levels and the risk of a common mental health disorder. CRF levels could be useful for identifying and preventing common mental health disorders at a population-level.

KW - Anxiety

KW - Depression

KW - Exercise

KW - Physical activity

KW - Prevention

KW - Risk factor

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85071713902&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.jad.2019.07.088

DO - 10.1016/j.jad.2019.07.088

M3 - Review article

C2 - 31398589

AN - SCOPUS:85071713902

VL - 257

SP - 748

EP - 757

JO - Journal of Affective Disorders

JF - Journal of Affective Disorders

SN - 0165-0327

ER -

View graph of relations

© 2018 King's College London | Strand | London WC2R 2LS | England | United Kingdom | Tel +44 (0)20 7836 5454