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The Association between Periodontal Disease and Root/Coronal Caries

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lina AlQobaly, Wael Sabbah

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)99-106
Number of pages8
JournalInternational Journal of Dental Hygiene
Volume18
Issue number1
Early online date18 Oct 2019
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Feb 2020

Bibliographical note

© 2019 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

King's Authors

Abstract

Objectives: To examine whether there is an association between periodontal disease and each of root caries and coronal caries among adults (aged 35 and over), using a nationally representative sample of adults in England, Northern Ireland and Wales. Material and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, data from the Adult Dental Health Survey 2009 were used. Adults aged 35 years or older who had periodontal and caries assessment were included. Two sets of negative binomial regression were conducted for each of coronal caries and root caries adjusting for periodontal diseases, dental visits, country, sex, age, education, job classification, oral hygiene and smoking. Results: Overall, 4738 were included in the analysis. Periodontal disease was significantly associated with each of coronal and root caries. In the fully adjusted model, those with PD/ LoA ≥ 4 mm had 1.03 rate ratio (RR) for coronal caries (95% CI: 1.01-1.05). In the model pertaining to root caries, the RR for those with periodontitis was 1.23 (95% CI: 1.16-1.30). Smoking, sex, age and oral hygiene were the variables that showed a consistent and significant association with coronal and root caries. Conclusion: Individuals with periodontal diseases appeared to be at higher risk of coronal and root caries. While root exposure could be a plausible explanation for the relationship between periodontitis and root caries, the association with coronal caries could be attributed to the irritation of carious cavities, or common risk factors such as poor oral hygiene, or co-occurrence of different health risk behaviours related to both caries and periodontitis and socioeconomic conditions.

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