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The Brief Memory and Executive Test (BMET): A cognitive screening tool to detect and differentiate vascular cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease

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The Brief Memory and Executive Test (BMET) : A cognitive screening tool to detect and differentiate vascular cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease. / Hollocks, Matthew J.; Brookes, Rebecca L.; Morris, Robin G.; Markus, Hugh S.

In: International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, 07.09.2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

Hollocks, MJ, Brookes, RL, Morris, RG & Markus, HS 2017, 'The Brief Memory and Executive Test (BMET): A cognitive screening tool to detect and differentiate vascular cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease', International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry. https://doi.org/10.1002/gps.4787

APA

Hollocks, M. J., Brookes, R. L., Morris, R. G., & Markus, H. S. (2017). The Brief Memory and Executive Test (BMET): A cognitive screening tool to detect and differentiate vascular cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease. International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry. https://doi.org/10.1002/gps.4787

Vancouver

Hollocks MJ, Brookes RL, Morris RG, Markus HS. The Brief Memory and Executive Test (BMET): A cognitive screening tool to detect and differentiate vascular cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease. International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry. 2017 Sep 7. https://doi.org/10.1002/gps.4787

Author

Hollocks, Matthew J. ; Brookes, Rebecca L. ; Morris, Robin G. ; Markus, Hugh S. / The Brief Memory and Executive Test (BMET) : A cognitive screening tool to detect and differentiate vascular cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease. In: International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry. 2017.

Bibtex Download

@article{b5dc449cc69846aa8abda63bd2a6a158,
title = "The Brief Memory and Executive Test (BMET): A cognitive screening tool to detect and differentiate vascular cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease",
abstract = "Objective: While there are several cognitive screening tests available for the detection of cortical dementias such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), these are rarely designed to be sensitive to vascular cognitive impairment (VCI). The Brief Memory and Executive Test (BMET) is a screening measure designed to be sensitive to the cognitive profile of both VCI and AD. This study investigated the ability of the BMET to detect AD, and to differentiate between VCI and AD. Methods: This study included 150 patients, with either SVD, both with (n = 48) and without VCI (n = 51), or AD (N = 51) and 51 healthy controls. Participants were aged between 40 and 90 years of age and completed both the BMET and the MMSE. Results: Receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curve analysis showed as before the BMET is a good predictor SVD. Additionally, the BMET was a good predictor of AD (AUC = 0.96) and performed at least as well as the MMSE (AUC = 0.92) when differentiating AD patients from healthy controls. The BMET had a sensitivity of 86{\%} and specificity of 100{\%} for detecting AD patients from control subjects. Using the difference in cognitive profile between the AD and VCI group, we developed an index score which correctly classified 76{\%} of patients as either having VCI or AD. Conclusion: The BMET is a brief and sensitive tool for the detection of cognitive impairment due to both SVD and AD and can be used to aid in the differentiation of the 2 diseases.",
keywords = "Dementia, Executive function, Memory disorders, Neurocognitive disorders, Stroke",
author = "Hollocks, {Matthew J.} and Brookes, {Rebecca L.} and Morris, {Robin G.} and Markus, {Hugh S.}",
year = "2017",
month = "9",
day = "7",
doi = "10.1002/gps.4787",
language = "English",
journal = "International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry",
issn = "0885-6230",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - The Brief Memory and Executive Test (BMET)

T2 - A cognitive screening tool to detect and differentiate vascular cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease

AU - Hollocks, Matthew J.

AU - Brookes, Rebecca L.

AU - Morris, Robin G.

AU - Markus, Hugh S.

PY - 2017/9/7

Y1 - 2017/9/7

N2 - Objective: While there are several cognitive screening tests available for the detection of cortical dementias such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), these are rarely designed to be sensitive to vascular cognitive impairment (VCI). The Brief Memory and Executive Test (BMET) is a screening measure designed to be sensitive to the cognitive profile of both VCI and AD. This study investigated the ability of the BMET to detect AD, and to differentiate between VCI and AD. Methods: This study included 150 patients, with either SVD, both with (n = 48) and without VCI (n = 51), or AD (N = 51) and 51 healthy controls. Participants were aged between 40 and 90 years of age and completed both the BMET and the MMSE. Results: Receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curve analysis showed as before the BMET is a good predictor SVD. Additionally, the BMET was a good predictor of AD (AUC = 0.96) and performed at least as well as the MMSE (AUC = 0.92) when differentiating AD patients from healthy controls. The BMET had a sensitivity of 86% and specificity of 100% for detecting AD patients from control subjects. Using the difference in cognitive profile between the AD and VCI group, we developed an index score which correctly classified 76% of patients as either having VCI or AD. Conclusion: The BMET is a brief and sensitive tool for the detection of cognitive impairment due to both SVD and AD and can be used to aid in the differentiation of the 2 diseases.

AB - Objective: While there are several cognitive screening tests available for the detection of cortical dementias such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), these are rarely designed to be sensitive to vascular cognitive impairment (VCI). The Brief Memory and Executive Test (BMET) is a screening measure designed to be sensitive to the cognitive profile of both VCI and AD. This study investigated the ability of the BMET to detect AD, and to differentiate between VCI and AD. Methods: This study included 150 patients, with either SVD, both with (n = 48) and without VCI (n = 51), or AD (N = 51) and 51 healthy controls. Participants were aged between 40 and 90 years of age and completed both the BMET and the MMSE. Results: Receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curve analysis showed as before the BMET is a good predictor SVD. Additionally, the BMET was a good predictor of AD (AUC = 0.96) and performed at least as well as the MMSE (AUC = 0.92) when differentiating AD patients from healthy controls. The BMET had a sensitivity of 86% and specificity of 100% for detecting AD patients from control subjects. Using the difference in cognitive profile between the AD and VCI group, we developed an index score which correctly classified 76% of patients as either having VCI or AD. Conclusion: The BMET is a brief and sensitive tool for the detection of cognitive impairment due to both SVD and AD and can be used to aid in the differentiation of the 2 diseases.

KW - Dementia

KW - Executive function

KW - Memory disorders

KW - Neurocognitive disorders

KW - Stroke

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85029757999&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1002/gps.4787

DO - 10.1002/gps.4787

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:85029757999

JO - International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry

JF - International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry

SN - 0885-6230

ER -

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