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The Built Environment and Cognitive Disorders: Results From the Cognitive Function and Ageing Study II

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The Built Environment and Cognitive Disorders : Results From the Cognitive Function and Ageing Study II. / Wu, Yu-Tzu; Prina, A. Matthew; Jones, Andy; Matthews, Fiona E.; Brayne, Carol.

In: American Journal of Preventive Medicine, Vol. 53, No. 1, 07.2017, p. 25-32.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

Wu, Y-T, Prina, AM, Jones, A, Matthews, FE & Brayne, C 2017, 'The Built Environment and Cognitive Disorders: Results From the Cognitive Function and Ageing Study II', American Journal of Preventive Medicine, vol. 53, no. 1, pp. 25-32. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.amepre.2016.11.020

APA

Wu, Y-T., Prina, A. M., Jones, A., Matthews, F. E., & Brayne, C. (2017). The Built Environment and Cognitive Disorders: Results From the Cognitive Function and Ageing Study II. American Journal of Preventive Medicine, 53(1), 25-32. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.amepre.2016.11.020

Vancouver

Wu Y-T, Prina AM, Jones A, Matthews FE, Brayne C. The Built Environment and Cognitive Disorders: Results From the Cognitive Function and Ageing Study II. American Journal of Preventive Medicine. 2017 Jul;53(1):25-32. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.amepre.2016.11.020

Author

Wu, Yu-Tzu ; Prina, A. Matthew ; Jones, Andy ; Matthews, Fiona E. ; Brayne, Carol. / The Built Environment and Cognitive Disorders : Results From the Cognitive Function and Ageing Study II. In: American Journal of Preventive Medicine. 2017 ; Vol. 53, No. 1. pp. 25-32.

Bibtex Download

@article{11b7a31b030d4461973c180330b39d8f,
title = "The Built Environment and Cognitive Disorders: Results From the Cognitive Function and Ageing Study II",
abstract = "Introduction: Built environment features have been related to behavior modification and might stimulate cognitive activity with a potential impact on cognitive health in later life. This study investigated cross-sectional associations between features of land use and cognitive impairment and dementia, and also explored urban and rural differences in these associations. Methods: Postcodes of the 7,505 community-based participants (aged ≥65 years) in the Cognitive Function and Ageing Study II (collected in 2008-2011) were linked to environmental data from government statistics. Multilevel logistic regression investigated associations between cognitive impairment (defined as Mini-Mental State Examination score ≤25) and dementia (Geriatric Mental Status and Automatic Geriatric Examination for Computer-Assisted Taxonomy organicity level ≥3) and land use features, including natural environment availability and land use mix, fitting interaction terms with three rural/urban categories. Data were analyzed in 2015. Results: Associations between features of land use and cognitive impairment were not linear. After adjusting for individual-level factors and area deprivation, living in areas with high land use mix was associated with a nearly 30% decreased odds of cognitive impairment (OR=0.72, 95% CI=0.58, 0.89). This was similar, yet non-significant, for dementia (OR=0.70, 95% CI=0.46, 1.06). In conurbations, living in areas with high natural environment availability was associated with 30% reduced odds of cognitive impairment (OR=0.70, 95% CI=0.50, 0.97). Conclusions: Non-linear associations between features of land use and cognitive impairment were confirmed in this new cohort of older people in England. Both lack of and overload of environmental stimulation may be detrimental to cognition in later life.",
author = "Yu-Tzu Wu and Prina, {A. Matthew} and Andy Jones and Matthews, {Fiona E.} and Carol Brayne",
note = "Copyright {\textcopyright} 2016 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.",
year = "2017",
month = jul,
doi = "10.1016/j.amepre.2016.11.020",
language = "English",
volume = "53",
pages = "25--32",
journal = "American Journal of Preventive Medicine",
issn = "0749-3797",
publisher = "Elsevier Inc.",
number = "1",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - The Built Environment and Cognitive Disorders

T2 - Results From the Cognitive Function and Ageing Study II

AU - Wu, Yu-Tzu

AU - Prina, A. Matthew

AU - Jones, Andy

AU - Matthews, Fiona E.

AU - Brayne, Carol

N1 - Copyright © 2016 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

PY - 2017/7

Y1 - 2017/7

N2 - Introduction: Built environment features have been related to behavior modification and might stimulate cognitive activity with a potential impact on cognitive health in later life. This study investigated cross-sectional associations between features of land use and cognitive impairment and dementia, and also explored urban and rural differences in these associations. Methods: Postcodes of the 7,505 community-based participants (aged ≥65 years) in the Cognitive Function and Ageing Study II (collected in 2008-2011) were linked to environmental data from government statistics. Multilevel logistic regression investigated associations between cognitive impairment (defined as Mini-Mental State Examination score ≤25) and dementia (Geriatric Mental Status and Automatic Geriatric Examination for Computer-Assisted Taxonomy organicity level ≥3) and land use features, including natural environment availability and land use mix, fitting interaction terms with three rural/urban categories. Data were analyzed in 2015. Results: Associations between features of land use and cognitive impairment were not linear. After adjusting for individual-level factors and area deprivation, living in areas with high land use mix was associated with a nearly 30% decreased odds of cognitive impairment (OR=0.72, 95% CI=0.58, 0.89). This was similar, yet non-significant, for dementia (OR=0.70, 95% CI=0.46, 1.06). In conurbations, living in areas with high natural environment availability was associated with 30% reduced odds of cognitive impairment (OR=0.70, 95% CI=0.50, 0.97). Conclusions: Non-linear associations between features of land use and cognitive impairment were confirmed in this new cohort of older people in England. Both lack of and overload of environmental stimulation may be detrimental to cognition in later life.

AB - Introduction: Built environment features have been related to behavior modification and might stimulate cognitive activity with a potential impact on cognitive health in later life. This study investigated cross-sectional associations between features of land use and cognitive impairment and dementia, and also explored urban and rural differences in these associations. Methods: Postcodes of the 7,505 community-based participants (aged ≥65 years) in the Cognitive Function and Ageing Study II (collected in 2008-2011) were linked to environmental data from government statistics. Multilevel logistic regression investigated associations between cognitive impairment (defined as Mini-Mental State Examination score ≤25) and dementia (Geriatric Mental Status and Automatic Geriatric Examination for Computer-Assisted Taxonomy organicity level ≥3) and land use features, including natural environment availability and land use mix, fitting interaction terms with three rural/urban categories. Data were analyzed in 2015. Results: Associations between features of land use and cognitive impairment were not linear. After adjusting for individual-level factors and area deprivation, living in areas with high land use mix was associated with a nearly 30% decreased odds of cognitive impairment (OR=0.72, 95% CI=0.58, 0.89). This was similar, yet non-significant, for dementia (OR=0.70, 95% CI=0.46, 1.06). In conurbations, living in areas with high natural environment availability was associated with 30% reduced odds of cognitive impairment (OR=0.70, 95% CI=0.50, 0.97). Conclusions: Non-linear associations between features of land use and cognitive impairment were confirmed in this new cohort of older people in England. Both lack of and overload of environmental stimulation may be detrimental to cognition in later life.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85009204986&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.amepre.2016.11.020

DO - 10.1016/j.amepre.2016.11.020

M3 - Article

C2 - 28082001

AN - SCOPUS:85009204986

VL - 53

SP - 25

EP - 32

JO - American Journal of Preventive Medicine

JF - American Journal of Preventive Medicine

SN - 0749-3797

IS - 1

ER -

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