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The Central Asian Militants: Cannon Fodder of Global Jihadism or Revolutionary Vanguard?

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The Central Asian Militants : Cannon Fodder of Global Jihadism or Revolutionary Vanguard? / Matveeva, Anna; Giustozzi, Antonio.

In: Small Wars and Insurgencies, Vol. 29, No. 2, 04.03.2018, p. 189-206.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Harvard

Matveeva, A & Giustozzi, A 2018, 'The Central Asian Militants: Cannon Fodder of Global Jihadism or Revolutionary Vanguard?', Small Wars and Insurgencies, vol. 29, no. 2, pp. 189-206. https://doi.org/10.1080/09592318.2018.1433472

APA

Matveeva, A., & Giustozzi, A. (2018). The Central Asian Militants: Cannon Fodder of Global Jihadism or Revolutionary Vanguard? Small Wars and Insurgencies, 29(2), 189-206. https://doi.org/10.1080/09592318.2018.1433472

Vancouver

Matveeva A, Giustozzi A. The Central Asian Militants: Cannon Fodder of Global Jihadism or Revolutionary Vanguard? Small Wars and Insurgencies. 2018 Mar 4;29(2):189-206. https://doi.org/10.1080/09592318.2018.1433472

Author

Matveeva, Anna ; Giustozzi, Antonio. / The Central Asian Militants : Cannon Fodder of Global Jihadism or Revolutionary Vanguard?. In: Small Wars and Insurgencies. 2018 ; Vol. 29, No. 2. pp. 189-206.

Bibtex Download

@article{42f64a4729264418a430e039dc718736,
title = "The Central Asian Militants: Cannon Fodder of Global Jihadism or Revolutionary Vanguard?",
abstract = "Central Asians have long been present within the ranks of organisations linked to the global jihad movement, but has there been an acceleration in their recruitment in recent years? There is growing evidence of substantial numbers of Central Asians (mostly Uzbeks and Tajiks) present in Syria in the ranks of the Islamic State and of a number of organisations linked to Al-Qaida. There is also growing evidence of recruitment inside Kyrgizstan and Tajikistan at least (as opposed as among Central Asian emigrants). The authors argue that distrust towards information provided by the Central Asian regimes should not blind analysts towards an emerging trend, which has substantial destabilising potential. The factors driving this recruitment also seem to be much more complex than a rejection of the authoritarianism of the ruling elites.",
keywords = "Islamic State, jihadist recruitment Syria, Kyrghizstan, Tajikistan",
author = "Anna Matveeva and Antonio Giustozzi",
year = "2018",
month = mar,
day = "4",
doi = "10.1080/09592318.2018.1433472",
language = "English",
volume = "29",
pages = "189--206",
journal = "Small Wars and Insurgencies",
issn = "0959-2318",
publisher = "Routledge",
number = "2",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - The Central Asian Militants

T2 - Cannon Fodder of Global Jihadism or Revolutionary Vanguard?

AU - Matveeva, Anna

AU - Giustozzi, Antonio

PY - 2018/3/4

Y1 - 2018/3/4

N2 - Central Asians have long been present within the ranks of organisations linked to the global jihad movement, but has there been an acceleration in their recruitment in recent years? There is growing evidence of substantial numbers of Central Asians (mostly Uzbeks and Tajiks) present in Syria in the ranks of the Islamic State and of a number of organisations linked to Al-Qaida. There is also growing evidence of recruitment inside Kyrgizstan and Tajikistan at least (as opposed as among Central Asian emigrants). The authors argue that distrust towards information provided by the Central Asian regimes should not blind analysts towards an emerging trend, which has substantial destabilising potential. The factors driving this recruitment also seem to be much more complex than a rejection of the authoritarianism of the ruling elites.

AB - Central Asians have long been present within the ranks of organisations linked to the global jihad movement, but has there been an acceleration in their recruitment in recent years? There is growing evidence of substantial numbers of Central Asians (mostly Uzbeks and Tajiks) present in Syria in the ranks of the Islamic State and of a number of organisations linked to Al-Qaida. There is also growing evidence of recruitment inside Kyrgizstan and Tajikistan at least (as opposed as among Central Asian emigrants). The authors argue that distrust towards information provided by the Central Asian regimes should not blind analysts towards an emerging trend, which has substantial destabilising potential. The factors driving this recruitment also seem to be much more complex than a rejection of the authoritarianism of the ruling elites.

KW - Islamic State

KW - jihadist recruitment Syria

KW - Kyrghizstan

KW - Tajikistan

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85044256879&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1080/09592318.2018.1433472

DO - 10.1080/09592318.2018.1433472

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:85044256879

VL - 29

SP - 189

EP - 206

JO - Small Wars and Insurgencies

JF - Small Wars and Insurgencies

SN - 0959-2318

IS - 2

ER -

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