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The crucible of co-production: case study interviews with Recovery College practitioner trainers

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The crucible of co-production : case study interviews with Recovery College practitioner trainers. / Dalgarno, Mark; Oates, Jennifer.

In: HEALTH EDUCATION JOURNAL, Vol. 78, No. 8, 01.12.2019, p. 977-987.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

Dalgarno, M & Oates, J 2019, 'The crucible of co-production: case study interviews with Recovery College practitioner trainers', HEALTH EDUCATION JOURNAL, vol. 78, no. 8, pp. 977-987. https://doi.org/10.1177/0017896919856656

APA

Dalgarno, M., & Oates, J. (2019). The crucible of co-production: case study interviews with Recovery College practitioner trainers. HEALTH EDUCATION JOURNAL, 78(8), 977-987. https://doi.org/10.1177/0017896919856656

Vancouver

Dalgarno M, Oates J. The crucible of co-production: case study interviews with Recovery College practitioner trainers. HEALTH EDUCATION JOURNAL. 2019 Dec 1;78(8):977-987. https://doi.org/10.1177/0017896919856656

Author

Dalgarno, Mark ; Oates, Jennifer. / The crucible of co-production : case study interviews with Recovery College practitioner trainers. In: HEALTH EDUCATION JOURNAL. 2019 ; Vol. 78, No. 8. pp. 977-987.

Bibtex Download

@article{52feccf5d95b447d9f434534494253bc,
title = "The crucible of co-production: case study interviews with Recovery College practitioner trainers",
abstract = "Objectives: This study explored healthcare professionals{\textquoteright} accounts of being practitioner trainers in a mental health Recovery College, where they worked with peer trainers, who were people with lived experience of mental illness, to co-produce workshops for mental health service users and staff. The aim of this study was to understand the process of co-production in the Recovery College from the perspective of practitioner trainers.Design: Single-site case study.Setting: Recovery College in the South of England, open to staff and service users from one mental health care provider organisation.Methods: Semi-structured interviews with eight mental healthcare professionals. Tran-scripts were thematically analysed.Results: A central image of {\textquoteleft}the workshop as crucible{\textquoteright} emerged from the three themes de-rived from the analysis. Co-facilitating the workshop was a {\textquoteleft}structured{\textquoteright} encounter, within which health professionals experienced {\textquoteleft}dynamism{\textquoteright} and change. For them, this involved experiences of {\textquoteleft}challenge and discomfort.{\textquoteright}Conclusion: Findings from this study contribute to the evidence base for the evaluation of Recovery Colleges by focusing on the training impact on staff. Findings suggest that taking on a trainer role in Recovery College co-production is beneficial for healthcare profession-als as well as mental health service users, especially if healthcare professionals are open to the dynamism and possible discomfort of these workshop encounters. Future research however should expand beyond single-site case studies to test the extent to which this metaphor and themes are appropriate to describing the {\textquoteleft}transformative{\textquoteright} element of co-pro-duction.",
keywords = "Educational co-production, Recovery Colleges, mental health, recovery, training",
author = "Mark Dalgarno and Jennifer Oates",
year = "2019",
month = dec,
day = "1",
doi = "10.1177/0017896919856656",
language = "English",
volume = "78",
pages = "977--987",
journal = "HEALTH EDUCATION JOURNAL",
issn = "0017-8969",
publisher = "SAGE Publications Ltd",
number = "8",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - The crucible of co-production

T2 - case study interviews with Recovery College practitioner trainers

AU - Dalgarno, Mark

AU - Oates, Jennifer

PY - 2019/12/1

Y1 - 2019/12/1

N2 - Objectives: This study explored healthcare professionals’ accounts of being practitioner trainers in a mental health Recovery College, where they worked with peer trainers, who were people with lived experience of mental illness, to co-produce workshops for mental health service users and staff. The aim of this study was to understand the process of co-production in the Recovery College from the perspective of practitioner trainers.Design: Single-site case study.Setting: Recovery College in the South of England, open to staff and service users from one mental health care provider organisation.Methods: Semi-structured interviews with eight mental healthcare professionals. Tran-scripts were thematically analysed.Results: A central image of ‘the workshop as crucible’ emerged from the three themes de-rived from the analysis. Co-facilitating the workshop was a ‘structured’ encounter, within which health professionals experienced ‘dynamism’ and change. For them, this involved experiences of ‘challenge and discomfort.’Conclusion: Findings from this study contribute to the evidence base for the evaluation of Recovery Colleges by focusing on the training impact on staff. Findings suggest that taking on a trainer role in Recovery College co-production is beneficial for healthcare profession-als as well as mental health service users, especially if healthcare professionals are open to the dynamism and possible discomfort of these workshop encounters. Future research however should expand beyond single-site case studies to test the extent to which this metaphor and themes are appropriate to describing the ‘transformative’ element of co-pro-duction.

AB - Objectives: This study explored healthcare professionals’ accounts of being practitioner trainers in a mental health Recovery College, where they worked with peer trainers, who were people with lived experience of mental illness, to co-produce workshops for mental health service users and staff. The aim of this study was to understand the process of co-production in the Recovery College from the perspective of practitioner trainers.Design: Single-site case study.Setting: Recovery College in the South of England, open to staff and service users from one mental health care provider organisation.Methods: Semi-structured interviews with eight mental healthcare professionals. Tran-scripts were thematically analysed.Results: A central image of ‘the workshop as crucible’ emerged from the three themes de-rived from the analysis. Co-facilitating the workshop was a ‘structured’ encounter, within which health professionals experienced ‘dynamism’ and change. For them, this involved experiences of ‘challenge and discomfort.’Conclusion: Findings from this study contribute to the evidence base for the evaluation of Recovery Colleges by focusing on the training impact on staff. Findings suggest that taking on a trainer role in Recovery College co-production is beneficial for healthcare profession-als as well as mental health service users, especially if healthcare professionals are open to the dynamism and possible discomfort of these workshop encounters. Future research however should expand beyond single-site case studies to test the extent to which this metaphor and themes are appropriate to describing the ‘transformative’ element of co-pro-duction.

KW - Educational co-production

KW - Recovery Colleges

KW - mental health

KW - recovery

KW - training

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85068593137&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1177/0017896919856656

DO - 10.1177/0017896919856656

M3 - Article

VL - 78

SP - 977

EP - 987

JO - HEALTH EDUCATION JOURNAL

JF - HEALTH EDUCATION JOURNAL

SN - 0017-8969

IS - 8

ER -

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