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The dynamics of domestic abuse and drug and alcohol dependency

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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The dynamics of domestic abuse and drug and alcohol dependency. / Gadd, David; Henderson, Juliet; Radcliffe, Polly; Stephens-Lewis, Danielle; Johnson, Amy; Gilchrist, Gail.

In: British Journal of Criminology, Vol. 59, No. 5, 12.08.2019, p. 1035-1053.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

Gadd, D, Henderson, J, Radcliffe, P, Stephens-Lewis, D, Johnson, A & Gilchrist, G 2019, 'The dynamics of domestic abuse and drug and alcohol dependency', British Journal of Criminology, vol. 59, no. 5, pp. 1035-1053. https://doi.org/10.1093/bjc/azz011

APA

Gadd, D., Henderson, J., Radcliffe, P., Stephens-Lewis, D., Johnson, A., & Gilchrist, G. (2019). The dynamics of domestic abuse and drug and alcohol dependency. British Journal of Criminology, 59(5), 1035-1053. https://doi.org/10.1093/bjc/azz011

Vancouver

Gadd D, Henderson J, Radcliffe P, Stephens-Lewis D, Johnson A, Gilchrist G. The dynamics of domestic abuse and drug and alcohol dependency. British Journal of Criminology. 2019 Aug 12;59(5):1035-1053. https://doi.org/10.1093/bjc/azz011

Author

Gadd, David ; Henderson, Juliet ; Radcliffe, Polly ; Stephens-Lewis, Danielle ; Johnson, Amy ; Gilchrist, Gail. / The dynamics of domestic abuse and drug and alcohol dependency. In: British Journal of Criminology. 2019 ; Vol. 59, No. 5. pp. 1035-1053.

Bibtex Download

@article{6131a7d97817490481829c826ede7b68,
title = "The dynamics of domestic abuse and drug and alcohol dependency",
abstract = "This article elucidates the dynamics that occur in relationships where there have been both substance use and domestic abuse. It draws interpretively on in-depth qualitative interviews with male perpetrators and their current and former partners. These interviews were undertaken for the National Institute for Health Research-funded ADVANCE programme. The article's analysis highlights the diverse ways in which domestic abuse by substance-using male partners is compounded for women who have never been substance dependent, women who have formerly been substance dependent and women who are currently substance dependent. The criminological implications of the competing models of change deployed in drug treatment and domestic violence intervention are discussed alongside the policy and practice challenges entailed in reconciling them within intervention contexts where specialist service provision has been scaled back and victims navigate pressures to stay with perpetrators while they undergo treatment alongside the threat of sanction should they seek protection from the police and courts.",
keywords = "Alcohol, Coercive control, Domestic abuse protection orders, Domestic homicide, Drug use, Substance dependence",
author = "David Gadd and Juliet Henderson and Polly Radcliffe and Danielle Stephens-Lewis and Amy Johnson and Gail Gilchrist",
year = "2019",
month = "8",
day = "12",
doi = "10.1093/bjc/azz011",
language = "English",
volume = "59",
pages = "1035--1053",
journal = "The British Journal of Criminology",
issn = "0007-0955",
publisher = "Oxford University Press",
number = "5",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - The dynamics of domestic abuse and drug and alcohol dependency

AU - Gadd, David

AU - Henderson, Juliet

AU - Radcliffe, Polly

AU - Stephens-Lewis, Danielle

AU - Johnson, Amy

AU - Gilchrist, Gail

PY - 2019/8/12

Y1 - 2019/8/12

N2 - This article elucidates the dynamics that occur in relationships where there have been both substance use and domestic abuse. It draws interpretively on in-depth qualitative interviews with male perpetrators and their current and former partners. These interviews were undertaken for the National Institute for Health Research-funded ADVANCE programme. The article's analysis highlights the diverse ways in which domestic abuse by substance-using male partners is compounded for women who have never been substance dependent, women who have formerly been substance dependent and women who are currently substance dependent. The criminological implications of the competing models of change deployed in drug treatment and domestic violence intervention are discussed alongside the policy and practice challenges entailed in reconciling them within intervention contexts where specialist service provision has been scaled back and victims navigate pressures to stay with perpetrators while they undergo treatment alongside the threat of sanction should they seek protection from the police and courts.

AB - This article elucidates the dynamics that occur in relationships where there have been both substance use and domestic abuse. It draws interpretively on in-depth qualitative interviews with male perpetrators and their current and former partners. These interviews were undertaken for the National Institute for Health Research-funded ADVANCE programme. The article's analysis highlights the diverse ways in which domestic abuse by substance-using male partners is compounded for women who have never been substance dependent, women who have formerly been substance dependent and women who are currently substance dependent. The criminological implications of the competing models of change deployed in drug treatment and domestic violence intervention are discussed alongside the policy and practice challenges entailed in reconciling them within intervention contexts where specialist service provision has been scaled back and victims navigate pressures to stay with perpetrators while they undergo treatment alongside the threat of sanction should they seek protection from the police and courts.

KW - Alcohol

KW - Coercive control

KW - Domestic abuse protection orders

KW - Domestic homicide

KW - Drug use

KW - Substance dependence

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85074012298&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1093/bjc/azz011

DO - 10.1093/bjc/azz011

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:85074012298

VL - 59

SP - 1035

EP - 1053

JO - The British Journal of Criminology

JF - The British Journal of Criminology

SN - 0007-0955

IS - 5

ER -

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