The effect of Omicron breakthrough infection and extended BNT162b2 booster dosing on neutralization breadth against SARS-CoV-2 variants of concern

Carl Graham, Thomas Lechmere, Aisha Rehman, Jeffrey Seow, Ashwini Kurshan, Isabella Huettner, Thomas J.A. Maguire, Jerry Tam, Daniel Cox, Christopher Ward, Mariusz Racz, Anele Waters, Christine Mant, Michael H. Malim, Julie Fox, Katie J. Doores*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

COVID-19 vaccines are playing a vital role in controlling the COVID-19 pandemic. As SARS-CoV-2 variants encoding mutations in the surface glycoprotein, Spike, continue to emerge, there is increased need to identify immunogens and vaccination regimens that provide the broadest and most durable immune responses. We compared the magnitude and breadth of the neutralizing antibody response, as well as levels of Spike-reactive memory B cells, in individuals receiving a second dose of BNT126b2 at a short (3–4 week) or extended interval (8–12 weeks) and following a third vaccination approximately 6–8 months later. We show that whilst an extended interval between the first two vaccinations can greatly increase the breadth of the immune response and generate a higher proportion of Spike reactive memory B cells, a third vaccination leads to similar levels between the two groups. Furthermore, we show that the third vaccine dose enhances neutralization activity against omicron lineage members BA.1, BA.2 and BA.4/BA.5 and this is further increased following breakthrough infection during the UK omicron wave. These findings are relevant for vaccination strategies in populations where COVID-19 vaccine coverage remains low.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere1010882
JournalPLoS Pathogens
Volume18
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2022

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'The effect of Omicron breakthrough infection and extended BNT162b2 booster dosing on neutralization breadth against SARS-CoV-2 variants of concern'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this