The effect of open kinetic chain knee extensor resistance training at different training loads on anterior knee laxity in the uninjured

Massimo G. Barcellona, Matthew C. Morrissey*

*Corresponding author for this work

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    4 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Background: The commonly used open kinetic chain knee extensor (OKCKE) exercise loads the sagittal restraints to knee anterior tibial translation. Objective: To investigate the effect of different loads of OKCKE resistance training on anterior knee laxity (AKL) in the uninjured knee. Study design: non-clinical trial. Methods: Randomization into one of three supervised training groups occurred with training 3 times per week for 12 weeks. Subjects in the LOW and HIGH groups performed OKCKE resistance training at loads of 2 sets of 20 repetition maximum (RM) and 20 sets of 2RM, respectively. Subjects in the isokinetic training group (ISOK) performed isokinetic OKCKE resistance training using 2 sets of 20 maximal efforts. AKL was measured using the KT2000 arthrometer with concurrent measurement of lateral hamstrings muscle activity at baseline, 6 weeks and 12 weeks. Results: Twenty six subjects participated (LOW n = 9, HIGH n = 10, ISOK n = 7). The main finding from this study is that a 12-week OKCKE resistance training programme at loads of 20 sets of 2RM, leads to an increase in manual maximal AKL. Conclusions: OKCKE resistance training at high loads (20 sets of 2RM) increases AKL while low load OKCKE resistance training (2 sets of 20RM) and isokinetic OKCKE resistance training at 2 sets of 20RM does not.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)1-8
    Number of pages8
    JournalManual Therapy
    Volume22
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 1 Apr 2016

    Keywords

    • Hypermobility
    • Joint stability
    • Resistance training
    • Therapeutic exercise

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