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The effects of partial sleep deprivation on energy balance: A systematic review and meta-analysis

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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The effects of partial sleep deprivation on energy balance : A systematic review and meta-analysis. / Al Khatib, H. K.; Harding, S. V.; Darzi, J.; Pot, G. K.

In: European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Vol. 71, No. 5, 01.05.2017, p. 614-624.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Harvard

Al Khatib, HK, Harding, SV, Darzi, J & Pot, GK 2017, 'The effects of partial sleep deprivation on energy balance: A systematic review and meta-analysis', European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 71, no. 5, pp. 614-624. https://doi.org/10.1038/ejcn.2016.201

APA

Al Khatib, H. K., Harding, S. V., Darzi, J., & Pot, G. K. (2017). The effects of partial sleep deprivation on energy balance: A systematic review and meta-analysis. European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 71(5), 614-624. https://doi.org/10.1038/ejcn.2016.201

Vancouver

Al Khatib HK, Harding SV, Darzi J, Pot GK. The effects of partial sleep deprivation on energy balance: A systematic review and meta-analysis. European Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 2017 May 1;71(5):614-624. https://doi.org/10.1038/ejcn.2016.201

Author

Al Khatib, H. K. ; Harding, S. V. ; Darzi, J. ; Pot, G. K. / The effects of partial sleep deprivation on energy balance : A systematic review and meta-analysis. In: European Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 2017 ; Vol. 71, No. 5. pp. 614-624.

Bibtex Download

@article{becc8c88d70a461a80601ae29c16c6c0,
title = "The effects of partial sleep deprivation on energy balance: A systematic review and meta-analysis",
abstract = "Background/Objectives:It is unknown whether short sleep duration causatively contributes to weight gain. Studies investigating effects of partial sleep deprivation (PSD) on energy balance components report conflicting findings. Our objective was to conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis of human intervention studies assessing the effects of PSD on energy intake (EI) and energy expenditure (EE).Subjects/Methods:EMBASE, Medline, Cochrane CENTRAL, Web of Science and Scopus were searched. Differences in EI and total EE following PSD compared with a control condition were generated using the inverse variance method with random-effects models. Secondary outcomes included macronutrient distribution and resting metabolic rate. Heterogeneity was quantified with the I 2 -statistic.Results:Seventeen studies (n=496) were eligible for inclusion in the systematic review, and 11 studies (n=172) provided sufficient data to be included in meta-analyses. EI was significantly increased by 385 kcal (95% confidence interval: 252, 517; P<0.00001) following PSD compared with the control condition. We found no significant change in total EE or resting metabolic rate as a result of PSD. The observed increase in EI was accompanied by significantly higher fat and lower protein intakes, but no effect on carbohydrate intake.Conclusions:The pooled effects of the studies with extractable data indicated that PSD resulted in increased EI with no effect on EE, leading to a net positive energy balance, which in the long term may contribute to weight gain.",
author = "{Al Khatib}, {H. K.} and Harding, {S. V.} and J. Darzi and Pot, {G. K.}",
year = "2017",
month = may,
day = "1",
doi = "10.1038/ejcn.2016.201",
language = "English",
volume = "71",
pages = "614--624",
journal = "European Journal of Clinical Nutrition",
issn = "0954-3007",
publisher = "Springer Nature [academic journals on nature.com]",
number = "5",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - The effects of partial sleep deprivation on energy balance

T2 - A systematic review and meta-analysis

AU - Al Khatib, H. K.

AU - Harding, S. V.

AU - Darzi, J.

AU - Pot, G. K.

PY - 2017/5/1

Y1 - 2017/5/1

N2 - Background/Objectives:It is unknown whether short sleep duration causatively contributes to weight gain. Studies investigating effects of partial sleep deprivation (PSD) on energy balance components report conflicting findings. Our objective was to conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis of human intervention studies assessing the effects of PSD on energy intake (EI) and energy expenditure (EE).Subjects/Methods:EMBASE, Medline, Cochrane CENTRAL, Web of Science and Scopus were searched. Differences in EI and total EE following PSD compared with a control condition were generated using the inverse variance method with random-effects models. Secondary outcomes included macronutrient distribution and resting metabolic rate. Heterogeneity was quantified with the I 2 -statistic.Results:Seventeen studies (n=496) were eligible for inclusion in the systematic review, and 11 studies (n=172) provided sufficient data to be included in meta-analyses. EI was significantly increased by 385 kcal (95% confidence interval: 252, 517; P<0.00001) following PSD compared with the control condition. We found no significant change in total EE or resting metabolic rate as a result of PSD. The observed increase in EI was accompanied by significantly higher fat and lower protein intakes, but no effect on carbohydrate intake.Conclusions:The pooled effects of the studies with extractable data indicated that PSD resulted in increased EI with no effect on EE, leading to a net positive energy balance, which in the long term may contribute to weight gain.

AB - Background/Objectives:It is unknown whether short sleep duration causatively contributes to weight gain. Studies investigating effects of partial sleep deprivation (PSD) on energy balance components report conflicting findings. Our objective was to conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis of human intervention studies assessing the effects of PSD on energy intake (EI) and energy expenditure (EE).Subjects/Methods:EMBASE, Medline, Cochrane CENTRAL, Web of Science and Scopus were searched. Differences in EI and total EE following PSD compared with a control condition were generated using the inverse variance method with random-effects models. Secondary outcomes included macronutrient distribution and resting metabolic rate. Heterogeneity was quantified with the I 2 -statistic.Results:Seventeen studies (n=496) were eligible for inclusion in the systematic review, and 11 studies (n=172) provided sufficient data to be included in meta-analyses. EI was significantly increased by 385 kcal (95% confidence interval: 252, 517; P<0.00001) following PSD compared with the control condition. We found no significant change in total EE or resting metabolic rate as a result of PSD. The observed increase in EI was accompanied by significantly higher fat and lower protein intakes, but no effect on carbohydrate intake.Conclusions:The pooled effects of the studies with extractable data indicated that PSD resulted in increased EI with no effect on EE, leading to a net positive energy balance, which in the long term may contribute to weight gain.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84994078549&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1038/ejcn.2016.201

DO - 10.1038/ejcn.2016.201

M3 - Review article

AN - SCOPUS:84994078549

VL - 71

SP - 614

EP - 624

JO - European Journal of Clinical Nutrition

JF - European Journal of Clinical Nutrition

SN - 0954-3007

IS - 5

ER -

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