The effects of tryptophan loading on Attention Deficit Hyperactivity in adults: A remote double blind randomised controlled trial

Larisa M. Dinu, Samriddhi N. Singh, Neo S. Baker, Alexandra L. Georgescu, Paul G. Overton, Eleanor J. Dommett

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Abstract

Background
Despite the impact and prevalence of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), current treatment options remain limited and there is a drive for alternative approaches, including those building on evidence of a role for tryptophan (TRP) and serotonin (5-HT). This study aimed to evaluate the effect of acute TRP loading on attention and impulsivity in adults with ADHD.
Trial design and methods
We conducted a remote double blind randomised controlled trial (RCT) using TRP loading to examine the effects of a balanced amino acid load in comparison to low and high TRP loading in individuals with ADHD (medicated, N = 48, and unmedicated, N = 46) and controls (N = 50). Participants were randomised into one of three TRP treatment groups using stratified randomisation considering participant group and gender using a 1:1:1 ratio. Baseline testing of attention and impulsivity using the Test of Variables of Attention Task, Delay Discounting Task, and Iowa Gambling Task was followed by consumption of a protein drink (BAL, LOW, or HIGH TRP) before repeated testing.
Results and Conclusions
No effects of TRP were observed for any of the measures. In the present study, TRP loading did not impact on any measure of attention or impulsivity in those with ADHD or Controls. The findings need to be confirmed in another trial with a larger number of patients that also considers additional measures of dietary protein, plasma TRP and aggression. (Registration ID ISRCTN15119603)
Original languageEnglish
JournalPLoS One
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 22 Nov 2023

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