King's College London

Research portal

The experiences of high intensity therapists delivering cognitive behavioural therapy to people with intellectual disabilities

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Hayley Marwood, Deborah Chinn, Kenneth Gannon, Katrina Scior

Original languageEnglish
JournalJOURNAL OF APPLIED RESEARCH IN INTELLECTUAL DISABILITIES
Early online date24 Jan 2017
DOIs
Accepted/In press28 Nov 2016
E-pub ahead of print24 Jan 2017

Documents

King's Authors

Abstract

Background

People with intellectual disabilities (ID) should be able to access the Improving Access to Psychological Therapies (IAPT) programme, currently a main provider of mainstream mental health services in England. IAPT offer cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) to individuals experiencing mental health problems, although its effectiveness for people with ID, when delivered within IAPT, is unclear.
Method

Ten high-intensity therapists took part in semi-structured interviews, analysed using thematic analysis, regarding their experiences of delivering CBT to people with ID in IAPT.
Results

The rigidity of the IAPT model appears to offer a poor fit with the needs of people with ID. Therapists appeared uncertain about how to modify CBT and highlighted training and service development needs.
Conclusions

Findings suggest barriers to accessing IAPT largely remain unaddressed where people with ID are concerned. Services may need to reconsider what constitutes appropriate reasonable adjustments to ensure equitable access.

Download statistics

No data available

View graph of relations

© 2020 King's College London | Strand | London WC2R 2LS | England | United Kingdom | Tel +44 (0)20 7836 5454