The government of self-regulation: on the comparative dynamics of corporate social responsibility

Jean-Pascal Gond, Nahee Kang, Jeremy Moon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

249 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This paper explores the relationship between corporate social responsibility (CSR) and government. CSR is often viewed as self-regulation, devoid of government. We attribute the scholarly neglect of the variety of CSR-government relations to the inadequate attention paid to the important differences in the way in which CSR has ‘travelled’ (or diffused), and has been mediated by the national governance systems, and the insufficient emphasis given to the role of the government (or government agency) in the CSR domain. We go on to identify a number of different types of CSR-government configurations, and by following empirically the CSR development trajectories in Western Europe and East Asia in a comparative historical perspective, we derive a set of propositions on the changing dynamics of CSR-government configurations. In particular, we highlight the varied role that the governments can play in order to promote CSR in the context of the wider national governance systems.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)640-671
Number of pages32
JournalECONOMY AND SOCIETY
Volume40
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2011

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