The human endoplasmic reticulum molecular chaperone BiP is an autoantigen for rheumatoid arthritis and prevents the induction of experimental arthritis

V M Corrigall, M D Bodman-Smith, M S Fife, B Canas, L K Myers, P H Wooley, C Soh, N A Staines, D J C Pappin, S E Berlo, W van Eden, R van der Zee, J S Lanchbury, G S Panayi

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157 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is the most common, crippling human autoimmune disease. Using Western blotting and tandem mass spectroscopy, we have identified the endoplasmic reticulum chaperone BiP, a 78-kDa glucose-regulated protein, as a possible autoantigen, It preferentially stimulated increased proliferation of synovial T cells from patients with RA but not from patients with other arthritides. Mice with established collagen- or pristane-induced arthritis developed IgG Abs to BiP. Although BiP injected in CFA failed to induce arthritis in several strains of rats and mice, including HLA-DR4(+/-) and HLA-DR1(+/+)-transgenic animals, it completely inhibited the development of arthritis when given i.v. 1 wk before the injection of type II collagen arthritis. Preimmunization with BiP suppressed the development of adjuvant arthritis in Lewis rats in a similar manner. This is the first report of a mammalian chaperone that is an autoantigen in human RA and in experimental arthritis and that can also prevent the induction of experimental arthritis. These findings may stimulate the development of new immunotherapies for the treatment of RA.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1492 - 1498
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Immunology
Volume166
Issue number3
Publication statusPublished - 1 Feb 2001

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