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The immortal forgotten other gang: Dwarf Cedalion, Lame Hephaestus, and Blind Orion

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterpeer-review

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The immortal forgotten other gang : Dwarf Cedalion, Lame Hephaestus, and Blind Orion. / Hall, Edith.

Disability Studies and the Classical Body: The Forgotten Other. Taylor and Francis Inc., 2021. p. 215-236.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterpeer-review

Harvard

Hall, E 2021, The immortal forgotten other gang: Dwarf Cedalion, Lame Hephaestus, and Blind Orion. in Disability Studies and the Classical Body: The Forgotten Other. Taylor and Francis Inc., pp. 215-236.

APA

Hall, E. (2021). The immortal forgotten other gang: Dwarf Cedalion, Lame Hephaestus, and Blind Orion. In Disability Studies and the Classical Body: The Forgotten Other (pp. 215-236). Taylor and Francis Inc..

Vancouver

Hall E. The immortal forgotten other gang: Dwarf Cedalion, Lame Hephaestus, and Blind Orion. In Disability Studies and the Classical Body: The Forgotten Other. Taylor and Francis Inc. 2021. p. 215-236

Author

Hall, Edith. / The immortal forgotten other gang : Dwarf Cedalion, Lame Hephaestus, and Blind Orion. Disability Studies and the Classical Body: The Forgotten Other. Taylor and Francis Inc., 2021. pp. 215-236

Bibtex Download

@inbook{22e8315fa5be4ac08727deee1238f120,
title = "The immortal forgotten other gang: Dwarf Cedalion, Lame Hephaestus, and Blind Orion",
abstract = "This article explores an ancient mythological narrative in which three disabled immortals unite in a quest. Lucian's On the Hall (28-29) describes a painting in which Orion, who has been blinded, carries the dwarf Cedalion on his shoulders. Cedalion directs him towards the sunlight that will restore his sight. Hephaestus, who is lame, watches them from his home island of Lemnos. This description inspired one of Nicolas Poussin's most famous classical landscapes, Blind Orion Searching for the Rising Sun. The myth of the three supernatural friends, disabled in different ways but mutually supporting one another, might reflect some aspect of the reality of the lives of disabled individuals in antiquity, or of medical procedures associated with Lemnos, or both. Although not claiming that the mythical narrative encapsulated in Lucian's ecphrasis has ever been previously interpreted, either in antiquity or more recently, as providing a positive representation of mutual self-help among disabled communities, my own interpretation springs from the premise that classical material needs to be open to new readings. If it can be reinterpreted from feminist, anti-racist, postcolonial, pro-youth, and anti-classist perspectives, why not from the perspective of 'the forgotten other'?.",
author = "Edith Hall",
note = "Publisher Copyright: {\textcopyright} 2021 selection and editorial matter, Ellen Adams; individual chapters, the contributors. Copyright: Copyright 2021 Elsevier B.V., All rights reserved.",
year = "2021",
month = may,
day = "14",
language = "English",
isbn = "9780367221959",
pages = "215--236",
booktitle = "Disability Studies and the Classical Body",
publisher = "Taylor and Francis Inc.",
address = "United States",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) Download

TY - CHAP

T1 - The immortal forgotten other gang

T2 - Dwarf Cedalion, Lame Hephaestus, and Blind Orion

AU - Hall, Edith

N1 - Publisher Copyright: © 2021 selection and editorial matter, Ellen Adams; individual chapters, the contributors. Copyright: Copyright 2021 Elsevier B.V., All rights reserved.

PY - 2021/5/14

Y1 - 2021/5/14

N2 - This article explores an ancient mythological narrative in which three disabled immortals unite in a quest. Lucian's On the Hall (28-29) describes a painting in which Orion, who has been blinded, carries the dwarf Cedalion on his shoulders. Cedalion directs him towards the sunlight that will restore his sight. Hephaestus, who is lame, watches them from his home island of Lemnos. This description inspired one of Nicolas Poussin's most famous classical landscapes, Blind Orion Searching for the Rising Sun. The myth of the three supernatural friends, disabled in different ways but mutually supporting one another, might reflect some aspect of the reality of the lives of disabled individuals in antiquity, or of medical procedures associated with Lemnos, or both. Although not claiming that the mythical narrative encapsulated in Lucian's ecphrasis has ever been previously interpreted, either in antiquity or more recently, as providing a positive representation of mutual self-help among disabled communities, my own interpretation springs from the premise that classical material needs to be open to new readings. If it can be reinterpreted from feminist, anti-racist, postcolonial, pro-youth, and anti-classist perspectives, why not from the perspective of 'the forgotten other'?.

AB - This article explores an ancient mythological narrative in which three disabled immortals unite in a quest. Lucian's On the Hall (28-29) describes a painting in which Orion, who has been blinded, carries the dwarf Cedalion on his shoulders. Cedalion directs him towards the sunlight that will restore his sight. Hephaestus, who is lame, watches them from his home island of Lemnos. This description inspired one of Nicolas Poussin's most famous classical landscapes, Blind Orion Searching for the Rising Sun. The myth of the three supernatural friends, disabled in different ways but mutually supporting one another, might reflect some aspect of the reality of the lives of disabled individuals in antiquity, or of medical procedures associated with Lemnos, or both. Although not claiming that the mythical narrative encapsulated in Lucian's ecphrasis has ever been previously interpreted, either in antiquity or more recently, as providing a positive representation of mutual self-help among disabled communities, my own interpretation springs from the premise that classical material needs to be open to new readings. If it can be reinterpreted from feminist, anti-racist, postcolonial, pro-youth, and anti-classist perspectives, why not from the perspective of 'the forgotten other'?.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85108668271&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Chapter

AN - SCOPUS:85108668271

SN - 9780367221959

SP - 215

EP - 236

BT - Disability Studies and the Classical Body

PB - Taylor and Francis Inc.

ER -

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