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The immunology of sepsis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Tom van der Poll, Manu Shankar-Hari, W. Joost Wiersinga

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2450-2464
Number of pages15
JournalImmunity
Volume54
Issue number11
Early online date9 Nov 2021
DOIs
E-pub ahead of print9 Nov 2021
Published9 Nov 2021

Bibliographical note

Funding Information: We would like to thank Maartje Kunen for preparing the figures. W.J.W. is supported by the Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research (VIDI grant 91716475). W.J.W. and T.v.d.P. receive funding from the EU-project ImmunoSep (847422). M.S.-H. is supported by the National Institute for Health Research Clinician Scientist Award (NIHR-CS-2016-16-011). The views expressed in this publication are those of the author(s) and not necessarily those of the NHS, the UK National Institute for Health Research, or the Department of Health. The authors declare no competing interests. Funding Information: We would like to thank Maartje Kunen for preparing the figures. W.J.W. is supported by the Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research (VIDI grant 91716475 ). W.J.W. and T.v.d.P. receive funding from the EU-project ImmunoSep ( 847422 ). M.S.-H. is supported by the National Institute for Health Research Clinician Scientist Award ( NIHR-CS-2016-16-011 ). The views expressed in this publication are those of the author(s) and not necessarily those of the NHS, the UK National Institute for Health Research, or the Department of Health. Publisher Copyright: © 2021

King's Authors

Abstract

Sepsis is defined as a life-threatening organ dysfunction caused by a dysregulated host response to an infection. This recently implemented definition does not capture the heterogeneity or the underlying pathophysiology of the syndrome, which is characterized by concurrent unbalanced hyperinflammation and immune suppression. Here, we review current knowledge of aberrant immune responses during sepsis and recent initiatives to stratify patients with sepsis into subgroups that are more alike from a clinical and/or pathobiological perspective, which could be key for identification of patients who are more likely to benefit from specific immune interventions.

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