The impact of obesity on orthodontic treatment outcome in adolescents: a prospective clinical cohort study

Hayder F Saloom, Roshanak Boustan, Jadbinder Seehra, Spyridon N Papageorgiou, Guy Carpenter, Martyn Cobourne

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction: This prospective clinical cohort study investigated the potential influence of obesity on orthodontic treatment outcome.

Methods: A prospective cohort of adolescent patients undergoing routine fixed appliance treatment were recruited into normal-weight or obese groups based upon body mass index (BMI) centile and followed up until the completion of treatment. Primary outcome was treatment duration, and secondary outcomes included treatment outcome (occlusal change measured using peer assessment rating [PAR]), appointment characteristics, and compliance measures.

Results: A total of 45 patients mean age 14.8 (1.6) years were included in the final analysis. The normal-weight group included 23 patients with mean BMI 19.4 (2.4) kg/m2 and the obese group 22 patients with mean BMI 30.5 (3.8) kg/m2. There were no significant differences in baseline demographics between groups, except for BMI and pre-treatment PAR. The normal-weight group had a mean pre-treatment PAR of 25.6 (8.3) and the obese 33.3 (11.8) giving the obese group a more severe pre-treatment malocclusion (P = 0.02). There were no significant differences in treatment duration between groups (P = 0.36), but obese patients needed less time per each additional baseline PAR point compared to normal weight (P = 0.02). Obese patients also needed less appointments compared to normal-weight patients (P = 0.02). There were no significant differences between groups for appointment characteristics or compliance. Finally, obese patients were more likely to experience a great PAR reduction than normal-weight patients (relative risk = 2.6; 95% confidence interval = 1.2-4.2; P = 0.02).

Conclusions: There were no significant differences in treatment duration between obese and normal-weight patients. Obesity does not appear to be a risk factor for negative orthodontic treatment outcome with fixed appliances.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)cjaa032
JournalEuropean Journal of Orthodontics
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - May 2020

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