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The Information Value of Non-Genetic Inheritance in Plants and Animals

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The Information Value of Non-Genetic Inheritance in Plants and Animals. / English, Sinead; Pen, Ido; Shea, Nicholas; Uller, Tobias.

In: PLoS ONE, Vol. 10, No. 1, e0116996, 21.01.2015.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

English, S, Pen, I, Shea, N & Uller, T 2015, 'The Information Value of Non-Genetic Inheritance in Plants and Animals', PLoS ONE, vol. 10, no. 1, e0116996. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0116996

APA

English, S., Pen, I., Shea, N., & Uller, T. (2015). The Information Value of Non-Genetic Inheritance in Plants and Animals. PLoS ONE, 10(1), [e0116996]. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0116996

Vancouver

English S, Pen I, Shea N, Uller T. The Information Value of Non-Genetic Inheritance in Plants and Animals. PLoS ONE. 2015 Jan 21;10(1). e0116996. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0116996

Author

English, Sinead ; Pen, Ido ; Shea, Nicholas ; Uller, Tobias. / The Information Value of Non-Genetic Inheritance in Plants and Animals. In: PLoS ONE. 2015 ; Vol. 10, No. 1.

Bibtex Download

@article{95a92462c4ee4ad48a952ae9cd06b196,
title = "The Information Value of Non-Genetic Inheritance in Plants and Animals",
abstract = "Parents influence the development of their offspring in many ways beyond the transmission of DNA. This includes transfer of epigenetic states, nutrients, antibodies and hormones, and behavioural interactions after birth. While the evolutionary consequences of such non-genetic inheritance are increasingly well understood, less is known about how inheritance mechanisms evolve. Here, we present a simple but versatile model to explore the adaptive evolution of non-genetic inheritance. Our model is based on a switch mechanism that produces alternative phenotypes in response to different inputs, including genes and non-genetic factors transmitted from parents and the environment experienced during development. This framework shows how genetic and non-genetic inheritance mechanisms and environmental conditions can act as cues by carrying correlational information about future selective conditions. Differential use of these cues is manifested as different degrees of genetic, parental or environmental morph determination. We use this framework to evaluate the conditions favouring non-genetic inheritance, as opposed to genetic determination of phenotype or within-generation plasticity, by applying it to two putative examples of adaptive non-genetic inheritance: maternal effects on seed germination in plants and transgenerational phase shift in desert locusts. Our simulation models show how the adaptive value of non-genetic inheritance depends on its mechanism, the pace of environmental change, and life history characteristics.",
author = "Sinead English and Ido Pen and Nicholas Shea and Tobias Uller",
year = "2015",
month = jan,
day = "21",
doi = "10.1371/journal.pone.0116996",
language = "English",
volume = "10",
journal = "PL o S One ",
issn = "1932-6203",
publisher = "Public Library of Science",
number = "1",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - The Information Value of Non-Genetic Inheritance in Plants and Animals

AU - English, Sinead

AU - Pen, Ido

AU - Shea, Nicholas

AU - Uller, Tobias

PY - 2015/1/21

Y1 - 2015/1/21

N2 - Parents influence the development of their offspring in many ways beyond the transmission of DNA. This includes transfer of epigenetic states, nutrients, antibodies and hormones, and behavioural interactions after birth. While the evolutionary consequences of such non-genetic inheritance are increasingly well understood, less is known about how inheritance mechanisms evolve. Here, we present a simple but versatile model to explore the adaptive evolution of non-genetic inheritance. Our model is based on a switch mechanism that produces alternative phenotypes in response to different inputs, including genes and non-genetic factors transmitted from parents and the environment experienced during development. This framework shows how genetic and non-genetic inheritance mechanisms and environmental conditions can act as cues by carrying correlational information about future selective conditions. Differential use of these cues is manifested as different degrees of genetic, parental or environmental morph determination. We use this framework to evaluate the conditions favouring non-genetic inheritance, as opposed to genetic determination of phenotype or within-generation plasticity, by applying it to two putative examples of adaptive non-genetic inheritance: maternal effects on seed germination in plants and transgenerational phase shift in desert locusts. Our simulation models show how the adaptive value of non-genetic inheritance depends on its mechanism, the pace of environmental change, and life history characteristics.

AB - Parents influence the development of their offspring in many ways beyond the transmission of DNA. This includes transfer of epigenetic states, nutrients, antibodies and hormones, and behavioural interactions after birth. While the evolutionary consequences of such non-genetic inheritance are increasingly well understood, less is known about how inheritance mechanisms evolve. Here, we present a simple but versatile model to explore the adaptive evolution of non-genetic inheritance. Our model is based on a switch mechanism that produces alternative phenotypes in response to different inputs, including genes and non-genetic factors transmitted from parents and the environment experienced during development. This framework shows how genetic and non-genetic inheritance mechanisms and environmental conditions can act as cues by carrying correlational information about future selective conditions. Differential use of these cues is manifested as different degrees of genetic, parental or environmental morph determination. We use this framework to evaluate the conditions favouring non-genetic inheritance, as opposed to genetic determination of phenotype or within-generation plasticity, by applying it to two putative examples of adaptive non-genetic inheritance: maternal effects on seed germination in plants and transgenerational phase shift in desert locusts. Our simulation models show how the adaptive value of non-genetic inheritance depends on its mechanism, the pace of environmental change, and life history characteristics.

U2 - 10.1371/journal.pone.0116996

DO - 10.1371/journal.pone.0116996

M3 - Article

C2 - 25603120

VL - 10

JO - PL o S One

JF - PL o S One

SN - 1932-6203

IS - 1

M1 - e0116996

ER -

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